Posts tagged babies

Photo by Karl Nawezi/MSF
Taghry and Masaya, along with six children, were among the 15,000 people who fled the conflict in Mali in January 2013 and sought safety in neighboring Mauritania. They arrived with nothing other than the clothes on their backs and are now completely dependent on humanitarian aid….On arriving in Bassikounou, an ultrasound confirmed Taghry was pregnant with quadruplets. The MSF medical team made the quick decision to perform a caesarean section. Taghry gave birth to three small but healthy boys and one healthy girl. At first, they are simply called Baby 1, 2, 3 and 4. Saturday is International Women’s Day. On that day, and every day, thousands of women worldwide will leave their homes to flee war or persecution. The fact that they are women makes their ordeal even more harrowing. Read this and other stories: http://bit.ly/1fLR5fE

Photo by Karl Nawezi/MSF

Taghry and Masaya, along with six children, were among the 15,000 people who fled the conflict in Mali in January 2013 and sought safety in neighboring Mauritania. They arrived with nothing other than the clothes on their backs and are now completely dependent on humanitarian aid….On arriving in Bassikounou, an ultrasound confirmed Taghry was pregnant with quadruplets. The MSF medical team made the quick decision to perform a caesarean section. Taghry gave birth to three small but healthy boys and one healthy girl. At first, they are simply called Baby 1, 2, 3 and 4. Saturday is International Women’s Day. On that day, and every day, thousands of women worldwide will leave their homes to flee war or persecution. The fact that they are women makes their ordeal even more harrowing. Read this and other stories: http://bit.ly/1fLR5fE

“Refugee children are incredibly vulnerable to developing vaccine-preventable diseases, so why do we keep hearing the players in the global vaccination community tell us these kids aren’t their problem?” asked Kate Elder, vaccines policy advisor at MSF’s Access Campaign. Read more

“Refugee children are incredibly vulnerable to developing vaccine-preventable diseases, so why do we keep hearing the players in the global vaccination community tell us these kids aren’t their problem?” asked Kate Elder, vaccines policy advisor at MSF’s Access Campaign. Read more

Photo:This nine-month-old baby was recently diagnosed with MDR-TB. There is no guidance from the World Health Organization on the best way to treat children with drug-resistant TB. Nurses have to cut adult-formulation pills, which is imprecise and creates a greater risk of over- or under-dosing the child. Kyrgyzstan 2013 © Vincent Tremeau
Surviving Two Years of Treatment for Drug-Resistant TB in Kyrgyzstan
MSF works in the penitentiary and civilian sectors in Kyrgyzstan offering treatment for multi-drug resistant TB. In February 2012, MSF began offering comprehensive medical care for people with drug-resistant TB and people co-infected with HIV and TB in the district of Kara-Suu, southwestern Kyrgyzstan, where the rates of drug-resistant strains of TB are particularly high. Teams also offer psycho-social support to encourage adherence to the arduous two-year treatment program. While the team has helped renovate the TB hospital in Kara Suu to improve infection control, the aim is to enable patients to be treated on an outpatient basis, at clinics closer to home.

Photo:This nine-month-old baby was recently diagnosed with MDR-TB. There is no guidance from the World Health Organization on the best way to treat children with drug-resistant TB. Nurses have to cut adult-formulation pills, which is imprecise and creates a greater risk of over- or under-dosing the child. Kyrgyzstan 2013 © Vincent Tremeau

Surviving Two Years of Treatment for Drug-Resistant TB in Kyrgyzstan

MSF works in the penitentiary and civilian sectors in Kyrgyzstan offering treatment for multi-drug resistant TB. In February 2012, MSF began offering comprehensive medical care for people with drug-resistant TB and people co-infected with HIV and TB in the district of Kara-Suu, southwestern Kyrgyzstan, where the rates of drug-resistant strains of TB are particularly high. Teams also offer psycho-social support to encourage adherence to the arduous two-year treatment program. While the team has helped renovate the TB hospital in Kara Suu to improve infection control, the aim is to enable patients to be treated on an outpatient basis, at clinics closer to home.

"Both babies in breech position were successfully delivered at 3pm in the afternoon in the hospital, and all three are alive today, as well as the mother. Baby one weighed 1900 grams and baby two and three both were 2000 grams. Survival in motherhood is a challenge in this setting and is a key reason for MSF’s work in Chad. Another woman who suffered complications from a spontaneous abortion died last night at our hospital, following a hysterectomy for uncontrollable bleeding."
MSF Doctor, Raghu, blogs about the highs and lows of surviving motherhood in Chad. Please leave your questions and comments for Raghu below his blog post. 

"Both babies in breech position were successfully delivered at 3pm in the afternoon in the hospital, and all three are alive today, as well as the mother. Baby one weighed 1900 grams and baby two and three both were 2000 grams. Survival in motherhood is a challenge in this setting and is a key reason for MSF’s work in Chad. Another woman who suffered complications from a spontaneous abortion died last night at our hospital, following a hysterectomy for uncontrollable bleeding."

MSF Doctor, Raghu, blogs about the highs and lows of surviving motherhood in Chad. Please leave your questions and comments for Raghu below his blog post. 

Photo: MSF doctor Christoph Hoehn and nurse Gulru Nobodieva examine a nine-month old baby in Dushanbe, Tajikistan. sTajikistan 2013 © Christoph Hoehn/MSF
Tajikistan: MSF Treats its Youngest-Ever Patient with Multidrug-Resistant TB
“Shirinmo is not the youngest child we have seen with tuberculosis, but she is the youngest patient we have diagnosed with MDR-TB,” says Dr. Christoph Hoehn of MSF, which opened its children’s MDR-TB project in Tajikistan in late 2011. “Babies have a high risk of developing these diseases because their immune system hasn’t fully matured,” he says.
MSF has started formulating MDR-TB drugs specifically for children at a pharmacy in Dushanbe. Until now, there were no MDR-TB formulations on the market for children, who had to take drugs produced for adults—usually large, hard-to-swallow pills with a very unpleasant taste. MSF staff created a child-friendly syrup by dissolving the drugs in a flavored liquid, which is measured into appropriate doses for babies and adolescents. Tajikistan is the first MSF project where this formulation is being used to treat young patients, including Shirinmo.

Photo: MSF doctor Christoph Hoehn and nurse Gulru Nobodieva examine a nine-month old baby in Dushanbe, Tajikistan. sTajikistan 2013 © Christoph Hoehn/MSF

Tajikistan: MSF Treats its Youngest-Ever Patient with Multidrug-Resistant TB

“Shirinmo is not the youngest child we have seen with tuberculosis, but she is the youngest patient we have diagnosed with MDR-TB,” says Dr. Christoph Hoehn of MSF, which opened its children’s MDR-TB project in Tajikistan in late 2011. “Babies have a high risk of developing these diseases because their immune system hasn’t fully matured,” he says.

MSF has started formulating MDR-TB drugs specifically for children at a pharmacy in Dushanbe. Until now, there were no MDR-TB formulations on the market for children, who had to take drugs produced for adults—usually large, hard-to-swallow pills with a very unpleasant taste. MSF staff created a child-friendly syrup by dissolving the drugs in a flavored liquid, which is measured into appropriate doses for babies and adolescents. Tajikistan is the first MSF project where this formulation is being used to treat young patients, including Shirinmo.

Photo: Bruno weighing babies at the Malhangalene Health Centre. Maputo, Mozambique 2012. © Andre Francois
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Photo: Bruno weighing babies at the Malhangalene Health Centre. Maputo, Mozambique 2012. © Andre Francois

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Just as I arrived they had an emergency obstetric patient with forearm presentation being transferred to the MSF hospital in Nasir in South Sudan. I asked if I could go and within 15 minutes we were off on the boat. The young mum was 17 and this was her first delivery. About an hour into the two-and-a-half hour trip the girl became distraught with pain and began moving around, rocking the boat, trying to find a comfortable position. This became quite difficult as the IV suspended from the ceiling was getting twisted and there was nothing other than reassurance and back rubbing that we could offer her. Our midwife was getting stressed as we had lost the last four babies she had transferred. Once we finally arrived in Nasir, we carried her straight to the theatre and less than 10 minutes later she was on the table.
Read Australian nurse Kate’s latest blog post from the Nuer region of Ethiopia. Please leave your questions and comments for Kate in the comments box below her blog post. 
Better Treatment for HIV-Positive Pregnant Women

The World Health Organization recently issued new guidelines to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. The recommendations include getting more women on treatment sooner and staying on it for life. The guidelines have the support of Doctors Without Borders.

Read more on this article from Voice of America.


Photo: MSF / Brendan Bannon
MSF HIV specialist Dr. Eamonn Vitt examines an HIV positive Ugandan woman who’s 7 months pregnant. (Nov. 2009)

Better Treatment for HIV-Positive Pregnant Women

The World Health Organization recently issued new guidelines to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. The recommendations include getting more women on treatment sooner and staying on it for life. The guidelines have the support of Doctors Without Borders. Read more on this article from Voice of America. Photo: MSF / Brendan Bannon
MSF HIV specialist Dr. Eamonn Vitt examines an HIV positive Ugandan woman who’s 7 months pregnant. (Nov. 2009)

HIV in infants born to HIV-positive mothers is a big problem in the developing world. There are around 2 million HIV-positive children in developing countries, whereas in the United Kingdom, for example, there are just 70. So, we’ve almost got rid of this problem in the West, but in the developing world it’s a big problem.
Dr. Nathan Ford, MSF Medical Aid Coordinator, in an interview on Voice of America about better treatment for HIV-positive pregnant women.
Iraq: Working to Reduce Neonatal Mortality in Najaf


Shinjiro Murata, a MSF field coordinator from Japan, worked with MSF in the southern Iraqi city of Najaf, where his main focus was setting up a new project focused on improving perinatal and obstetric care in one of the largest referral hospitals in the region. Here, he talks about his experience:

“I arrived in Najaf more than a year ago, in October 2010, to start an MSF project in the Al Zahara District Hospital. Najaf is located 160 kilometers (99 miles) south of Baghdad and is one of the holiest cities for Shia Muslims. It was not an easy task, and surely a challenging experience to be working in such a different country. My previous experience with MSF was in Africa, so when I started working in Najaf I realized that I would need to see things from a different perspective and adapt to the reality of a country that used to have a very well organized health system but, due to decades of conflict and international sanctions, has seen a rampant deterioration in health care provision.

MSF decided to start a medical program to support the main Ministry of Health referral hospital, the Al Zahara District Hospital, for obstetrics, gynecology, and pediatrics in Najaf city. The hospital is one of the largest hospitals in the region, with a 340-bed capacity, and it deals with approximately 1,950 deliveries per month. These account for almost 50 percent of the deliveries carried out in the whole Najaf Governorate, which has a total population of 1.2 million people. It is most of the time overcrowded with patients and the quality of medical services provided is sometimes not adequate.

After more than one year in Najaf I have seen that medical needs in the country are still very high. Until peace is restored in Iraq, MSF needs to continue supporting these pregnant women and newborn children. MSF is one of the few international medical humanitarian organizations working inside Iraq thanks to its independent, neutral, and impartial nature.Iraq 2011 © MSF
Two newborn babies in Al Zahara District Hospital, where MSF has been working since 2010

Iraq: Working to Reduce Neonatal Mortality in Najaf

Shinjiro Murata, a MSF field coordinator from Japan, worked with MSF in the southern Iraqi city of Najaf, where his main focus was setting up a new project focused on improving perinatal and obstetric care in one of the largest referral hospitals in the region. Here, he talks about his experience:

“I arrived in Najaf more than a year ago, in October 2010, to start an MSF project in the Al Zahara District Hospital. Najaf is located 160 kilometers (99 miles) south of Baghdad and is one of the holiest cities for Shia Muslims. It was not an easy task, and surely a challenging experience to be working in such a different country. My previous experience with MSF was in Africa, so when I started working in Najaf I realized that I would need to see things from a different perspective and adapt to the reality of a country that used to have a very well organized health system but, due to decades of conflict and international sanctions, has seen a rampant deterioration in health care provision.

MSF decided to start a medical program to support the main Ministry of Health referral hospital, the Al Zahara District Hospital, for obstetrics, gynecology, and pediatrics in Najaf city. The hospital is one of the largest hospitals in the region, with a 340-bed capacity, and it deals with approximately 1,950 deliveries per month. These account for almost 50 percent of the deliveries carried out in the whole Najaf Governorate, which has a total population of 1.2 million people. It is most of the time overcrowded with patients and the quality of medical services provided is sometimes not adequate.

After more than one year in Najaf I have seen that medical needs in the country are still very high. Until peace is restored in Iraq, MSF needs to continue supporting these pregnant women and newborn children. MSF is one of the few international medical humanitarian organizations working inside Iraq thanks to its independent, neutral, and impartial nature.

Iraq 2011 © MSF
Two newborn babies in Al Zahara District Hospital, where MSF has been working since 2010

IN CELEBRATION OF WOMEN’S DAY TODAY:Maternal Death: The Avoidable Crisis

Every year, hundreds of thousands of women around the world die avoidable deaths during childbirth, for lack of skilled birth attendants and basic medications, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders said in a report released today, in advance of International Women’s Day on March 8.

The report Maternal Death: The Avoidable Crisis details how the provision of emergency obstetric care to pregnant women in acute and chronic humanitarian crises can have a direct impact and save women’s lives. It examines the circumstances for pregnant women in 12 countries where MSF works, in settings ranging from conflict areas to countries with weak health systems, including Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, and Haiti. The report highlights the need for emergency medical assistance, particularly when pregnancy complications occur.Photo: Haiti 2012 © Frederik Matte/MSF
A woman holds her newborn at an MSF facility in Haiti.

IN CELEBRATION OF WOMEN’S DAY TODAY:
Maternal Death: The Avoidable Crisis


Every year, hundreds of thousands of women around the world die avoidable deaths during childbirth, for lack of skilled birth attendants and basic medications, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders said in a report released today, in advance of International Women’s Day on March 8.

The report Maternal Death: The Avoidable Crisis details how the provision of emergency obstetric care to pregnant women in acute and chronic humanitarian crises can have a direct impact and save women’s lives. It examines the circumstances for pregnant women in 12 countries where MSF works, in settings ranging from conflict areas to countries with weak health systems, including Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, and Haiti. The report highlights the need for emergency medical assistance, particularly when pregnancy complications occur.

Photo: Haiti 2012 © Frederik Matte/MSF A woman holds her newborn at an MSF facility in Haiti.