Posts tagged aids

Photo by Sven Torfinn
Swaziland is in the middle of a medical crisis. The highest HIV prevalence in the world and the emergence of drug-resistant TB threaten to have a disastrous effect on the social and economic situation there. 
Millions of people in developing countries are still waiting for the AIDS revolution. Join us for a Twitter chat on how millions of people are still waiting for the AIDS revolution: Friday, Dec. 6, 11am EST/5pm CET @MSF_SouthAfrica

Photo by Sven Torfinn

Swaziland is in the middle of a medical crisis. The highest HIV prevalence in the world and the emergence of drug-resistant TB threaten to have a disastrous effect on the social and economic situation there.

Millions of people in developing countries are still waiting for the AIDS revolution. Join us for a Twitter chat on how millions of people are still waiting for the AIDS revolution: Friday, Dec. 6, 11am EST/5pm CET @MSF_SouthAfrica

People living with HIV often face stigma and discrimination. Ko Tin Than lost everything when people found out he was HIV-positive. It even led to him stopping his treatment for a while. 

The fight against HIV/AIDS has been hailed as one of the most successful public health projects in human history, but MSF medical teams see the revolution as unfulfilled for millions of people excluded from treatment. Go to See.MSF.org to learn more.

Photo by Ton Koene
The upheaval in Central African Republic has meant HIV treatment interruptions and mounting medical needs. Meanwhile, health workers flee with their families to safety and the malaria season starts. MSF tries to respond to this ‘crisis on top of a crisis’.” 
Read more - http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/news/article.cfm?id=6804

Photo by Ton Koene

The upheaval in Central African Republic has meant HIV treatment interruptions and mounting medical needs. Meanwhile, health workers flee with their families to safety and the malaria season starts. MSF tries to respond to this ‘crisis on top of a crisis’.” 

Read more - http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/news/article.cfm?id=6804

Photo: A child at MSF’s intensive feeding center in Guidam Roumdji, Maradi region. Niger 2011 © Alessandra Vilas Boas
Rotavirus Research Results Show Need to Tailor Vaccines to Improve Their Impact
Cape Town/Geneva/New York, November 8, 2012- Research presented today by Epicentre, the epidemiological research arm of MSF and other African researchers, contributes to the growing body of evidence that the two existing rotavirus vaccines may not be best adapted for use in Africa.
“Vaccine developers have not taken into account the full rotavirus picture in places that are hardest hit by diarrheal illness and deaths caused by rotavirus,” said Dr. Anne-Laure Page, an epidemiologist at Epicentre. “This study adds to the growing body of research that underscores the need to ensure that vaccines are developed that effectively address the needs of developing countries.”
The two available rotavirus vaccines were developed and tested in industrialized countries, and have an efficacy rate of 90 percent against severe diarrhea in these countries, compared to an estimated 50-60 percent in countries in Africa and Asia. The current vaccines are also bulky and have a limited shelf life at room temperature, further making them unsuitable for developing countries that lack adequate refrigeration capacity.
“The fact that currently available vaccines are not easy to use in the places that are hardest to reach contributes to the fact that 22 million children born each year do not receive even the basic vaccination package,” said Elder.

Photo: A child at MSF’s intensive feeding center in Guidam Roumdji, Maradi region. Niger 2011 © Alessandra Vilas Boas

Rotavirus Research Results Show Need to Tailor Vaccines to Improve Their Impact

Cape Town/Geneva/New York, November 8, 2012- Research presented today by Epicentre, the epidemiological research arm of MSF and other African researchers, contributes to the growing body of evidence that the two existing rotavirus vaccines may not be best adapted for use in Africa.

“Vaccine developers have not taken into account the full rotavirus picture in places that are hardest hit by diarrheal illness and deaths caused by rotavirus,” said Dr. Anne-Laure Page, an epidemiologist at Epicentre. “This study adds to the growing body of research that underscores the need to ensure that vaccines are developed that effectively address the needs of developing countries.”

The two available rotavirus vaccines were developed and tested in industrialized countries, and have an efficacy rate of 90 percent against severe diarrhea in these countries, compared to an estimated 50-60 percent in countries in Africa and Asia. The current vaccines are also bulky and have a limited shelf life at room temperature, further making them unsuitable for developing countries that lack adequate refrigeration capacity.

“The fact that currently available vaccines are not easy to use in the places that are hardest to reach contributes to the fact that 22 million children born each year do not receive even the basic vaccination package,” said Elder.

"I’m Going to Tell The Whole World": An HIV "Expert Patient," In Her Own Words


In 2001, I tested positive for HIV. At that time, I was 25 years old and in a terrible state. I had lost a lot of weight, I was vomiting, had cold and hot rashes and was saying weird things. My whole body was covered with sores and I was confined to a wheelchair. Literally, I was more dead than alive.
In 2004, I started volunteering for an organization that helped people living with HIV/AIDS in Nhlangano, the capital of Shiselweni region. They asked me to share my experiences, and I told people about antiretroviral treatment and what it had done for me.

When I started seeing MSF cars in Nhlangano in 2009, I became curious and asked around. Someone told me what MSF was doing, and immediately I wrote my application letter and was hired as an “expert patient.” My role is to do pre and post-test counseling and to be there for the patients when they need support.

I really like the work with the patients. I know I give them hope by telling my story. Today I am fine. I have a healthy four-year-old boy who is HIV negative. Before I had him, five children I brought to this world had died, each after six months. My older son is 17, and he is well, too. I know what the patients are going through, and telling them my story and how important it is to stick to the treatment encourages them. The other day a young girl even told me I was her role model. That made me very happy.Photo: Thembi (right) with her two sons
Swaziland 2012 © Irene Jancsy/MSF

"I’m Going to Tell The Whole World": An HIV "Expert Patient," In Her Own Words

In 2001, I tested positive for HIV. At that time, I was 25 years old and in a terrible state. I had lost a lot of weight, I was vomiting, had cold and hot rashes and was saying weird things. My whole body was covered with sores and I was confined to a wheelchair. Literally, I was more dead than alive.

In 2004, I started volunteering for an organization that helped people living with HIV/AIDS in Nhlangano, the capital of Shiselweni region. They asked me to share my experiences, and I told people about antiretroviral treatment and what it had done for me.

When I started seeing MSF cars in Nhlangano in 2009, I became curious and asked around. Someone told me what MSF was doing, and immediately I wrote my application letter and was hired as an “expert patient.” My role is to do pre and post-test counseling and to be there for the patients when they need support.

I really like the work with the patients. I know I give them hope by telling my story. Today I am fine. I have a healthy four-year-old boy who is HIV negative. Before I had him, five children I brought to this world had died, each after six months. My older son is 17, and he is well, too. I know what the patients are going through, and telling them my story and how important it is to stick to the treatment encourages them. The other day a young girl even told me I was her role model. That made me very happy.

Photo: Thembi (right) with her two sons
Swaziland 2012 © Irene Jancsy/MSF

Last week, MSF joined thousands of protesters at the International AIDS Conference in Washington D.C., calling for governments and pharmaceutical companies to halt policies and practices that undermine access to medicines. Watch this video to hear protestors tell in their own voices why they marched.

Tuesday, MSF marched in the streets of DC with other organizations at the Internetional AIDS Conference. We told pharma to put people before profits. Millions die without access to affordable generic meds, we marched and will continue to march for them.

Tuesday, MSF marched in the streets of DC with other organizations at the Internetional AIDS Conference. We told pharma to put people before profits. Millions die without access to affordable generic meds, we marched and will continue to march for them.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a trade agreement for which the U.S. is demanding provisions that would roll back public health safeguards. It would allow pharma companies to patent minor modifications of old medicines, potentially keeping prices high indefinitely, and delaying access to more affordable generic medicines for our patients and millions of others.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a trade agreement for which the U.S. is demanding provisions that would roll back public health safeguards. It would allow pharma companies to patent minor modifications of old medicines, potentially keeping prices high indefinitely, and delaying access to more affordable generic medicines for our patients and millions of others.

Earlier this week, we introduced you to Mqondisi, the 17-year-old boy from Zimbabwe who is living with HIV. Today, he marched with MSF to the White House in Washington D.C. calling on pharma and the U.S. government to stop undercutting affordable medicines so that we can scale up HIV treatment and stop the virus.

Earlier this week, we introduced you to Mqondisi, the 17-year-old boy from Zimbabwe who is living with HIV.
Today, he marched with MSF to the White House in Washington D.C.
calling on pharma and the U.S. government to stop undercutting affordable medicines so that we can scale up HIV treatment and stop the virus.

In our satellite at the International AIDS conference this afternoon, we talked about how the market-driven medical research and development system leaves our field teams frustrated because the tools needed for our patients are unsuitable, unavailable, or unaffordable.Learn more here.

In our satellite at the International AIDS conference this afternoon, we talked about how the market-driven medical research and development system leaves our field teams frustrated because the tools needed for our patients are unsuitable, unavailable, or unaffordable.

Learn more here.

You’ll hear using the phrase “treatment is prevention” often this week as we report from the International AIDS Conference, so we thought we would explain what that means. Learn more about the profound implications of this scientific breakthrough.

You’ll hear using the phrase “treatment is prevention” often this week as we report from the International AIDS Conference, so we thought we would explain what that means.
Learn more about the profound implications of this scientific breakthrough.

Viral load monitoring tests the effectiveness of a patient’s HIV treatment. Because of high cost and tests that aren’t adapted to resource-limited settings, it’s not available to most people in developing countries. But for treatment as prevention to be successful, it must be a critical component of HIV programs. Learn more here.

Viral load monitoring tests the effectiveness of a patient’s HIV treatment. Because of high cost and tests that aren’t adapted to resource-limited settings, it’s not available to most people in developing countries. But for treatment as prevention to be successful, it must be a critical component of HIV programs.

Learn more here.

This week, we’re excited to be sending you updates from the 2012 International AIDS Conference in Washington DC. 

We’re kicking the conference off today with a satellite session on global innovation. This and other events will be webcast live at http://aids2012.msf.org/.

This week, we’re excited to be sending you updates from the 2012 International AIDS Conference in Washington DC.

We’re kicking the conference off today with a satellite session on global innovation. This and other events will be webcast live at http://aids2012.msf.org/.

The International AIDS Conference is the world’s most attended conference on HIV and AIDS. It’s happening next week, July 22 - 27, in Washington, D.C., and more than 40 members of our staff will be there highlighting the models of care, tools, and policies necessary to get the best treatment to the most people. Follow us for updates from the conference!

The International AIDS Conference is the world’s most attended conference on HIV and AIDS. It’s happening next week, July 22 - 27, in Washington, D.C., and more than 40 members of our staff will be there highlighting the models of care, tools, and policies necessary to get the best treatment to the most people.

Follow us for updates from the conference!

It’s very good news that the Global Fund is re-opening for business. Now we can stop wasting time, which is the most precious resource in this fight against HIV, TB and malaria, because wasting time is wasting lives. The new funding window at the Global Fund needs to be opened as soon as possible, be as big as possible, and be open to all affected countries to support treatment scale-up. Now is not the time to be conservative and keep money in the bank that could go toward getting life-saving pills into peoples’ bodies.
Sharonann Lynch, HIV/AIDS Policy Advisor at the MSF Access Campaign, on the Global Fund resuming new health grants. Years of hard work, coupled with new scientific advances, bring hope that with proper funding we can push back the three diseases that kill millions every year.