Posts tagged aid

Photo by William Daniels
MSF medical staff prepare an injured man to be moved across town from a camp to a hospital in Bangui, Central African Republic. Due to fighting between two main armed groups, many people in Bangui have been affected by extreme violence. Read more: http://bit.ly/1nqaSzY

Photo by William Daniels

MSF medical staff prepare an injured man to be moved across town from a camp to a hospital in Bangui, Central African Republic. Due to fighting between two main armed groups, many people in Bangui have been affected by extreme violence. Read more: http://bit.ly/1nqaSzY

Photo by Haroon Khan/MSF
MSF medical staff tend to a young patient in Karachi, Pakistan. The MSF clinic in Karachi provides basic health care and emergency services, including maternal healthcare, to people living in Machar Colony, a densely populated area that suffers from a lack of sanitation, high pollution, and few affordable health services.

Photo by Haroon Khan/MSF

MSF medical staff tend to a young patient in Karachi, Pakistan. The MSF clinic in Karachi provides basic health care and emergency services, including maternal healthcare, to people living in Machar Colony, a densely populated area that suffers from a lack of sanitation, high pollution, and few affordable health services.

This statement by Bayer CEO sums up everything that is wrong with the multinational pharmaceutical industry. Pharmaceutical companies are singularly focused on profit and so aggressively push for patents and high drug prices. Diseases that don’t promise a profit are neglected, and patients who can’t afford to pay are cut out of the picture. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Read our response:http://ow.ly/sS4Uc

This statement by Bayer CEO sums up everything that is wrong with the multinational pharmaceutical industry. Pharmaceutical companies are singularly focused on profit and so aggressively push for patents and high drug prices. Diseases that don’t promise a profit are neglected, and patients who can’t afford to pay are cut out of the picture. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Read our response:http://ow.ly/sS4Uc

Photo by Phil Moore
A girl recovers in an MSF clinic after suffering an electric shock from an exposed wire in a refugee camp in Juba, South Sudan. Roughly 300 miles north of Juba, in Malakal, MSF was forced to suspend its medical activities last week after the MSF compound was looted. Thousands of people were left without medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1aohxdM

Photo by Phil Moore

A girl recovers in an MSF clinic after suffering an electric shock from an exposed wire in a refugee camp in Juba, South Sudan. Roughly 300 miles north of Juba, in Malakal, MSF was forced to suspend its medical activities last week after the MSF compound was looted. Thousands of people were left without medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1aohxdM

Photo by Jake Simkin
An MSF medical worker in Juba, South Sudan, treats an injured woman, one of the 40,000 people taking refuge from fighting in that area. Overall, MSF emergency teams are working in Juba, Awerial, and Malakal, providing medical care to more than 110,000 displaced people. Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jake Simkin

An MSF medical worker in Juba, South Sudan, treats an injured woman, one of the 40,000 people taking refuge from fighting in that area. Overall, MSF emergency teams are working in Juba, Awerial, and Malakal, providing medical care to more than 110,000 displaced people. Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Phil Moore
An injured child receives medical care from MSF in Juba, South Sudan. Fighting throughout the country over the past three weeks has driven people from their homes and many are now sheltering in overcrowded camps with limited assistance. In Juba, MSF teams are seeing hundreds of people per day with diarrhea, malaria, and respiratory infections. “Highly vulnerable people have just become even more vulnerable,” said Raphael Gorgeu, MSF’s head of mission in South Sudan. “We don’t know what will happen to the thousands of displaced and wounded people across the country.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Phil Moore

An injured child receives medical care from MSF in Juba, South Sudan. Fighting throughout the country over the past three weeks has driven people from their homes and many are now sheltering in overcrowded camps with limited assistance. In Juba, MSF teams are seeing hundreds of people per day with diarrhea, malaria, and respiratory infections. “Highly vulnerable people have just become even more vulnerable,” said Raphael Gorgeu, MSF’s head of mission in South Sudan. “We don’t know what will happen to the thousands of displaced and wounded people across the country.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jake Simkin
A child receives treatment from an MSF doctor in Juba, South Sudan, where tens of thousands of people have taken refuge from fighting in the area. Even before the recent fighting broke out, 80% of all health care and basic services in South Sudan was provided by NGOs and many people had limited access to care. Now, due to the dangerous security conditions for residents and aid groups alike, access to care is even more limited, with potentially grave consequences. Read more:http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jake Simkin

A child receives treatment from an MSF doctor in Juba, South Sudan, where tens of thousands of people have taken refuge from fighting in the area. Even before the recent fighting broke out, 80% of all health care and basic services in South Sudan was provided by NGOs and many people had limited access to care. Now, due to the dangerous security conditions for residents and aid groups alike, access to care is even more limited, with potentially grave consequences. Read more:http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Caroline Van Nespen/MSF 
“The area is about 95 percent destroyed,” says Dr. Von Schreeb. “It reminds me very much of Haiti, where I worked after the earthquake, and also Aceh [in Indonesia, where MSF responded to a tsunami in 2010]. But there was no tsunami wave here; the wind was just so strong that it flattened everything.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1igeMfg

Photo by Caroline Van Nespen/MSF

“The area is about 95 percent destroyed,” says Dr. Von Schreeb. “It reminds me very much of Haiti, where I worked after the earthquake, and also Aceh [in Indonesia, where MSF responded to a tsunami in 2010]. But there was no tsunami wave here; the wind was just so strong that it flattened everything.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1igeMfg

As a doctor, in MSF work and in Canada, family members tap me on the shoulder and ask for my attention all the time. It’s hard to know if it is an emergency or a less serious concern. The man who was looking for his brother was just one of these worried family members the night of this critical event. Everyone who has lost their brother or their sister deserves a helping hand. That is what we are here to do.
A traffic accident with around 50 casualties puts Raghu and his team to the test. Raghu is a medical doctor working with MSF in Chad. Please leave your questions and comments for Raghu below his blog post.
Aid must not be hijacked as a political too
MSF is deeply concerned by the British Prime Minister’s statement yesterday, proposing to use more DFID funding to stabilise conflict-affected states to further national security interests. Aid must not be hijacked as a political tool, Mr Cameron.

Aid must not be hijacked as a political too

MSF is deeply concerned by the British Prime Minister’s statement yesterday, proposing to use more DFID funding to stabilise conflict-affected states to further national security interests. Aid must not be hijacked as a political tool, Mr Cameron.

Photo: An elderly Syrian refugee suffering from Parkinson’s disease sleeps in a room in a ramshackle home on a cattle ground in Tripoli, Lebanon, surrounded by his daughter-in-law and granddaughter. Lebanon 2013 © Michael Goldfarb
Lebanon: Aid Lags Far Behind as Syrian Refugees Increase
Syrians who have fled violent conflict at home to seek safety in Lebanon do not receive anywhere near adequate levels of humanitarian assistance and are living in extremely precarious conditions, a detailed survey released today by MSF.
The MSF report, “Misery Beyond the War Zone,” shows that of the 220,000Syrians who have sought refuge so far in Lebanon, many cannot obtain necessary health care, among other worrying findings. The survey, which follows a similarstudy carried out by MSF six months ago, reveals a marked deterioration of the humanitarian situation in Lebanon, in large part due to extremely lengthy registration delays. Refugees in Lebanon are not entitled to formal assistance if they are not registered. Lebanon is home to the largest number of Syrian refugees.

Photo: An elderly Syrian refugee suffering from Parkinson’s disease sleeps in a room in a ramshackle home on a cattle ground in Tripoli, Lebanon, surrounded by his daughter-in-law and granddaughter. Lebanon 2013 © Michael Goldfarb

Lebanon: Aid Lags Far Behind as Syrian Refugees Increase

Syrians who have fled violent conflict at home to seek safety in Lebanon do not receive anywhere near adequate levels of humanitarian assistance and are living in extremely precarious conditions, a detailed survey released today by MSF.

The MSF report, “Misery Beyond the War Zone,” shows that of the 220,000Syrians who have sought refuge so far in Lebanon, many cannot obtain necessary health care, among other worrying findings. The survey, which follows a similarstudy carried out by MSF six months ago, reveals a marked deterioration of the humanitarian situation in Lebanon, in large part due to extremely lengthy registration delays. Refugees in Lebanon are not entitled to formal assistance if they are not registered. Lebanon is home to the largest number of Syrian refugees.

Photo: People queue for food distribution in Mugunga III camp. DRC 2012 © Aurelie Baumel/MSF
DRC: High Levels of Sexual Violence in Goma Camps
People displaced by armed conflict around Goma are now suffering high levels of sexual violence in and around the camps where they have taken shelter.
Between December 3, 2012, and January 5, 2013, the MSF team working in Mugunga III camp, a few kilometers west of Goma, registered and treated 95 patients who were victims of sexual violence, with a notable increase in late December. MSF denounces the lack of action on the part of those responsible for protecting civilians and the poor security conditions in the Goma camps. 
“The camps and surrounding villages face a glaring lack of security,” said Thierry Goffeau, MSF head of mission in Goma. “The responsible authorities and the leaders of the various armed groups all claim—without exception—that they are defending the civilian populations. They must thus assume their responsibility and ensure that the most vulnerable are not subject to violence or reprisals.”

Photo: People queue for food distribution in Mugunga III camp. DRC 2012 © Aurelie Baumel/MSF

DRC: High Levels of Sexual Violence in Goma Camps

People displaced by armed conflict around Goma are now suffering high levels of sexual violence in and around the camps where they have taken shelter.

Between December 3, 2012, and January 5, 2013, the MSF team working in Mugunga III camp, a few kilometers west of Goma, registered and treated 95 patients who were victims of sexual violence, with a notable increase in late December. MSF denounces the lack of action on the part of those responsible for protecting civilians and the poor security conditions in the Goma camps. 

“The camps and surrounding villages face a glaring lack of security,” said Thierry Goffeau, MSF head of mission in Goma. “The responsible authorities and the leaders of the various armed groups all claim—without exception—that they are defending the civilian populations. They must thus assume their responsibility and ensure that the most vulnerable are not subject to violence or reprisals.”

We would like to highlight the humanitarian situation in this remote territory, and to see more aid organizations coming or returning as the needs are high and the situation is unlikely to calm down in the near future. Masisi territory has nearly as many people as the city of Goma and the humanitarian needs there are at least as significant. However, there are many fewer organizations working there. After the last few weeks’ fighting, the MSF teams find themselves alone. The violence in Masisi is receiving less media attention, but it is just as critical.
MSF program manager, Amaury Grégoire, calls upon the international aid community for help in DRC.

MSF has supported the General Hospital in Masisi since 2007 and provides free primary and secondary care there. Between January and September 2012, MSF hospitalized more than 5,800 patients, performed 1,320 surgeries and admitted 462 malnourished children and 653 pregnant women. 
Photo: The Domeez refugee camp in Iraq, where MSF has been treating Syrian refugees since this past May. Iraq 2012 © Fayçal Touiz/MSF
Humanitarian Response Still Insufficient For Syrians In and Out of the Country
The humanitarian situation in Syria continues to worsen as the war escalates and attacks against health facilities continue. Access to large parts of the country remains extremely difficult due to insecurity and heavy fighting, and more than two million people have been displaced. The number of Syrians seeking refuge in neighboring countries is increasing, but the humanitarian response in Lebanon and Iraq has so far been unable to meet their needs. The arrival of winter is exacerbating the difficult living conditions of Syrian refugees and the population remaining in the country
Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) currently works in three field hospitals in the north of Syria. Since June, 10,000 patients have received medical attention for reasons including violence-related injuries such as gunshot wounds, shrapnel wounds, open fractures, and injuries due to explosions. More than 900 surgical procedures have been carried out. Admissions are irregular, depending on shifting frontlines and whether it is possible to refer the wounded. MSF is also providing training in mass casualty management, triage, and emergency care to Syrian health personnel who need support in the management of war-wounded patients. Specific assistance is also being provided to medical facilities, such as helping set up an emergency room and a blood bank in Aleppo area.
Several other health facilities have been set up by Syrian doctors and other medical organizations to treat the wounded in the northern region. However, general access to health services remains limited for the population, particularly for people suffering from chronic illnesses. A significant number of MSF’s patients need treatment for chronic disease or accidental trauma, or assistance during childbirth. Further support needs to be developed to meet these needs.

Photo: The Domeez refugee camp in Iraq, where MSF has been treating Syrian refugees since this past May. Iraq 2012 © Fayçal Touiz/MSF

Humanitarian Response Still Insufficient For Syrians In and Out of the Country

The humanitarian situation in Syria continues to worsen as the war escalates and attacks against health facilities continue. Access to large parts of the country remains extremely difficult due to insecurity and heavy fighting, and more than two million people have been displaced. The number of Syrians seeking refuge in neighboring countries is increasing, but the humanitarian response in Lebanon and Iraq has so far been unable to meet their needs. The arrival of winter is exacerbating the difficult living conditions of Syrian refugees and the population remaining in the country

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) currently works in three field hospitals in the north of Syria. Since June, 10,000 patients have received medical attention for reasons including violence-related injuries such as gunshot wounds, shrapnel wounds, open fractures, and injuries due to explosions. More than 900 surgical procedures have been carried out. Admissions are irregular, depending on shifting frontlines and whether it is possible to refer the wounded. MSF is also providing training in mass casualty management, triage, and emergency care to Syrian health personnel who need support in the management of war-wounded patients. Specific assistance is also being provided to medical facilities, such as helping set up an emergency room and a blood bank in Aleppo area.

Several other health facilities have been set up by Syrian doctors and other medical organizations to treat the wounded in the northern region. However, general access to health services remains limited for the population, particularly for people suffering from chronic illnesses. A significant number of MSF’s patients need treatment for chronic disease or accidental trauma, or assistance during childbirth. Further support needs to be developed to meet these needs.

How MSF Works: Delivering Aid
MSF-Logistique is as a nonprofit humanitarian purchasing and distribution center. It is a licensed pharmaceutical institution, meaning we have permission from the French authorities to operate a business that deals with drugs. That’s why we have four pharmacists on staff. We are also licensed to hold materials in customs. All of our supplies are officially in transit because nothing in our warehouse is destined for use in Europe. With this status we avoid customs taxes, can store products for as long as needed, and can ship to the field right away, without worrying about clearing customs.

How MSF Works: Delivering Aid

MSF-Logistique is as a nonprofit humanitarian purchasing and distribution center. It is a licensed pharmaceutical institution, meaning we have permission from the French authorities to operate a business that deals with drugs. That’s why we have four pharmacists on staff. We are also licensed to hold materials in customs. All of our supplies are officially in transit because nothing in our warehouse is destined for use in Europe. With this status we avoid customs taxes, can store products for as long as needed, and can ship to the field right away, without worrying about clearing customs.