Posts tagged africa

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
Patients with leg wounds - most by bullets - lay in traction in a hospital in Bangui, Central African Republic. MSF is providing care in the only trauma unit in the city and has treated more than 800 patients with bullet and knife wounds since early December. Read more:http://bit.ly/1inqOoZ

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

Patients with leg wounds - most by bullets - lay in traction in a hospital in Bangui, Central African Republic. MSF is providing care in the only trauma unit in the city and has treated more than 800 patients with bullet and knife wounds since early December. Read more:http://bit.ly/1inqOoZ

Photo by Phil Moore
A girl recovers in an MSF clinic after suffering an electric shock from an exposed wire in a refugee camp in Juba, South Sudan. Roughly 300 miles north of Juba, in Malakal, MSF was forced to suspend its medical activities last week after the MSF compound was looted. Thousands of people were left without medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1aohxdM

Photo by Phil Moore

A girl recovers in an MSF clinic after suffering an electric shock from an exposed wire in a refugee camp in Juba, South Sudan. Roughly 300 miles north of Juba, in Malakal, MSF was forced to suspend its medical activities last week after the MSF compound was looted. Thousands of people were left without medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1aohxdM

Photo by Raphael Piret/MSF
Families displaced by violence in Bangui, Central African Republic, are living under the wings of an abandoned plane in a camp where around 100,000 people have taken refuge. Fighting continues in Bangui - already more than half a million people have been driven from their homes. MSF is providing medical care and vaccinations at several sites in Bangui. 

Photo by Raphael Piret/MSF

Families displaced by violence in Bangui, Central African Republic, are living under the wings of an abandoned plane in a camp where around 100,000 people have taken refuge. Fighting continues in Bangui - already more than half a million people have been driven from their homes. MSF is providing medical care and vaccinations at several sites in Bangui. 

Photo by Jake Simkin
An MSF medical worker in Juba, South Sudan, treats an injured woman, one of the 40,000 people taking refuge from fighting in that area. Overall, MSF emergency teams are working in Juba, Awerial, and Malakal, providing medical care to more than 110,000 displaced people. Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jake Simkin

An MSF medical worker in Juba, South Sudan, treats an injured woman, one of the 40,000 people taking refuge from fighting in that area. Overall, MSF emergency teams are working in Juba, Awerial, and Malakal, providing medical care to more than 110,000 displaced people. Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Phil Moore
An injured child receives medical care from MSF in Juba, South Sudan. Fighting throughout the country over the past three weeks has driven people from their homes and many are now sheltering in overcrowded camps with limited assistance. In Juba, MSF teams are seeing hundreds of people per day with diarrhea, malaria, and respiratory infections. “Highly vulnerable people have just become even more vulnerable,” said Raphael Gorgeu, MSF’s head of mission in South Sudan. “We don’t know what will happen to the thousands of displaced and wounded people across the country.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Phil Moore

An injured child receives medical care from MSF in Juba, South Sudan. Fighting throughout the country over the past three weeks has driven people from their homes and many are now sheltering in overcrowded camps with limited assistance. In Juba, MSF teams are seeing hundreds of people per day with diarrhea, malaria, and respiratory infections. “Highly vulnerable people have just become even more vulnerable,” said Raphael Gorgeu, MSF’s head of mission in South Sudan. “We don’t know what will happen to the thousands of displaced and wounded people across the country.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jake Simkin
A child receives treatment from an MSF doctor in Juba, South Sudan, where tens of thousands of people have taken refuge from fighting in the area. Even before the recent fighting broke out, 80% of all health care and basic services in South Sudan was provided by NGOs and many people had limited access to care. Now, due to the dangerous security conditions for residents and aid groups alike, access to care is even more limited, with potentially grave consequences. Read more:http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jake Simkin

A child receives treatment from an MSF doctor in Juba, South Sudan, where tens of thousands of people have taken refuge from fighting in the area. Even before the recent fighting broke out, 80% of all health care and basic services in South Sudan was provided by NGOs and many people had limited access to care. Now, due to the dangerous security conditions for residents and aid groups alike, access to care is even more limited, with potentially grave consequences. Read more:http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

From the series MSF in 2013:
“Traveling from village to village, we hear just one word: measles. People are frightened and hopeless. They’re asking for help.”— Nathalie Gielen, Doctors Without Borders team manager
An MSF doctor examines a child being treated for measles in Province Orientale, DRC. Photo © Tristan Pfund

From the series MSF in 2013:

“Traveling from village to village, we hear just one word: measles. People are frightened and hopeless. They’re asking for help.”
— Nathalie Gielen, Doctors Without Borders team manager

An MSF doctor examines a child being treated for measles in Province Orientale, DRC. Photo © Tristan Pfund

From the series MSF in 2013:
“We sent mobile clinics out to reach people who’d fled into the bush, where terrible conditions and lack of food made malnutrition a huge problem. Even though we were a small team we saved a lot of children’s lives that way.”— Dr. Yolaine Civil, Doctors Without Borders pediatrician in Central African Republic (CAR)MSF staff weigh a baby to check for malnutrition at a mobile clinic near Bossangoa, CAR. Photo © Ton Koene

From the series MSF in 2013:

“We sent mobile clinics out to reach people who’d fled into the bush, where terrible conditions and lack of food made malnutrition a huge problem. Even though we were a small team we saved a lot of children’s lives that way.”
— Dr. Yolaine Civil, Doctors Without Borders pediatrician in Central African Republic (CAR)
MSF staff weigh a baby to check for malnutrition at a mobile clinic near Bossangoa, CAR. Photo © Ton Koene

Photo by Jacob Simkin/MSF
South Sudan: Since fighting erupted in Bor, Jonglei State, people have been fleeing to the town of Awerial, in neighboring Lakes State, seeking safety. The area does not have the capacity to absorb all of the new arrivals, and living conditions are near catastrophic. More medical and humanitarian assistance is urgently needed. See a slideshow: http://bit.ly/1bWgOuq

Photo by Jacob Simkin/MSF

South Sudan: Since fighting erupted in Bor, Jonglei State, people have been fleeing to the town of Awerial, in neighboring Lakes State, seeking safety. The area does not have the capacity to absorb all of the new arrivals, and living conditions are near catastrophic. More medical and humanitarian assistance is urgently needed. See a slideshow: http://bit.ly/1bWgOuq

From the series MSF in 2013:
“We land in the bush with boxes of medicines, plastic sheeting and two stakes to provide a little shade and we go about our work with just the basics … [treating] people with serious infections, malnourished children, pregnant women with infections, and the list goes on.”—Caroline Scholtes, Doctors Without Borders nurse in South Sudan
MSF nurse Caroline Scholtes examines a baby during an MSF mobile clinic in Dorain, Jonglei State, South Sudan. Photo © Caroline Scholtes/MSF

From the series MSF in 2013:

“We land in the bush with boxes of medicines, plastic sheeting and two stakes to provide a little shade and we go about our work with just the basics … [treating] people with serious infections, malnourished children, pregnant women with infections, and the list goes on.”
—Caroline Scholtes, Doctors Without Borders nurse in South Sudan

MSF nurse Caroline Scholtes examines a baby during an MSF mobile clinic in Dorain, Jonglei State, South Sudan. Photo © Caroline Scholtes/MSF

Photo by Sven Torfinn
Swaziland is in the middle of a medical crisis. The highest HIV prevalence in the world and the emergence of drug-resistant TB threaten to have a disastrous effect on the social and economic situation there. 
Millions of people in developing countries are still waiting for the AIDS revolution. Join us for a Twitter chat on how millions of people are still waiting for the AIDS revolution: Friday, Dec. 6, 11am EST/5pm CET @MSF_SouthAfrica

Photo by Sven Torfinn

Swaziland is in the middle of a medical crisis. The highest HIV prevalence in the world and the emergence of drug-resistant TB threaten to have a disastrous effect on the social and economic situation there.

Millions of people in developing countries are still waiting for the AIDS revolution. Join us for a Twitter chat on how millions of people are still waiting for the AIDS revolution: Friday, Dec. 6, 11am EST/5pm CET @MSF_SouthAfrica

People living with HIV often face stigma and discrimination. Ko Tin Than lost everything when people found out he was HIV-positive. It even led to him stopping his treatment for a while. 

The fight against HIV/AIDS has been hailed as one of the most successful public health projects in human history, but MSF medical teams see the revolution as unfulfilled for millions of people excluded from treatment. Go to See.MSF.org to learn more.

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
Roughly one in 10 people in Central African Republic (CAR) have been driven from their homes by violence that has overwhelmed the country since a coup in March 2013. "We are extremely concerned about the living conditions of the displaced,” said Sylvain Groulx, MSF head of mission in CAR, “who are overcrowded in churches, mosques, or schools, or living in the bush with no access to health care, food, or water, and are threatened by epidemics. Much more needs to be done and it needs to be done now."

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

Roughly one in 10 people in Central African Republic (CAR) have been driven from their homes by violence that has overwhelmed the country since a coup in March 2013. "We are extremely concerned about the living conditions of the displaced,” said Sylvain Groulx, MSF head of mission in CAR, “who are overcrowded in churches, mosques, or schools, or living in the bush with no access to health care, food, or water, and are threatened by epidemics. Much more needs to be done and it needs to be done now."

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
New fighting and threats against civilians near the town of Bouca, Central African Republic (CAR), have pushed hundreds more people out of their homes, making the massive humanitarian crisis in this country even more severe. Read more: http://bit.ly/1ey3Kzq

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

New fighting and threats against civilians near the town of Bouca, Central African Republic (CAR), have pushed hundreds more people out of their homes, making the massive humanitarian crisis in this country even more severe. Read more: http://bit.ly/1ey3Kzq

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
Years of political and military instability in CAR have left the country in a chronic state of humanitarian crisis, particularly as it pertains to public health. The Ministry of Health has almost no presence outside of Bangui, the capital. There is just one doctor per 55,000 people and one nurse or midwife per 7,000 residents, according the United Nations, and most of those are in the capital. Read more: http://bit.ly/1exTtTP

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

Years of political and military instability in CAR have left the country in a chronic state of humanitarian crisis, particularly as it pertains to public health. The Ministry of Health has almost no presence outside of Bangui, the capital. There is just one doctor per 55,000 people and one nurse or midwife per 7,000 residents, according the United Nations, and most of those are in the capital. Read more: http://bit.ly/1exTtTP