Posts tagged Syria

Photo by Moises Saman/Magnum
Among the first challenges for Syrian refugees in Lebanon is finding shelter in the absence of any organized camps, a task that’s grown more difficult as their numbers continue to grow and tensions rise with local communities and each other. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Moises Saman/Magnum

Among the first challenges for Syrian refugees in Lebanon is finding shelter in the absence of any organized camps, a task that’s grown more difficult as their numbers continue to grow and tensions rise with local communities and each other. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor
During a typically busy morning at MSF’s clinic in Domeez camp, Iraq, a staff member checks a man’s injured hand while another checks a baby’s breathing. At least 58,000 people from Syria have sought safety at the camp. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor

During a typically busy morning at MSF’s clinic in Domeez camp, Iraq, a staff member checks a man’s injured hand while another checks a baby’s breathing. At least 58,000 people from Syria have sought safety at the camp. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor
New families continue to come from Syria to Domeez camp in Iraq, though the resources are stretched to the limit. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor

New families continue to come from Syria to Domeez camp in Iraq, though the resources are stretched to the limit. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene
During morning rounds at MSF’s surgery facility in Ramtha, Jordan, MSF’s Dr. Alwash consults with a colleague about a patient with eye and leg wounds. Staff have carried out more than 1,300 surgeries on more than 430 patients in Ramtha, many of them for severe, life-threatening injuries. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene

During morning rounds at MSF’s surgery facility in Ramtha, Jordan, MSF’s Dr. Alwash consults with a colleague about a patient with eye and leg wounds. Staff have carried out more than 1,300 surgeries on more than 430 patients in Ramtha, many of them for severe, life-threatening injuries. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene
In Ramtha, Jordan, MSF’s Dr. Ben Gupta plays chess with a 14-year-old boy named Malik who lost one leg and sustained severe injuries to his other extremities when a bomb fell on a wedding party at his family’s home in Syria. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene

In Ramtha, Jordan, MSF’s Dr. Ben Gupta plays chess with a 14-year-old boy named Malik who lost one leg and sustained severe injuries to his other extremities when a bomb fell on a wedding party at his family’s home in Syria. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene
Rukaya goes bravely into the operating room for her seventh surgery at MSF’s emergency surgery hospital in Ramtha, Iraq. The 14-year-old lost her legs and her mother in a bomb attack in Syria. “I don’t remember how I got here,” she says. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria. 

Photo by Ton Koene

Rukaya goes bravely into the operating room for her seventh surgery at MSF’s emergency surgery hospital in Ramtha, Iraq. The 14-year-old lost her legs and her mother in a bomb attack in Syria. “I don’t remember how I got here,” she says. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria. 

Photo by Ton Koene
Dr. Alwash, an Iraqi surgeon who was once a refugee himself, visits a patient who was wounded in his arm, chest, and leg. “All our patients are newly injured in this conflict,” he says, usually by bombs or gunshots. “Our work mainly concentrates first on saving lives—surgical procedures that can save lives or save limbs.” See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene

Dr. Alwash, an Iraqi surgeon who was once a refugee himself, visits a patient who was wounded in his arm, chest, and leg. “All our patients are newly injured in this conflict,” he says, usually by bombs or gunshots. “Our work mainly concentrates first on saving lives—surgical procedures that can save lives or save limbs.” See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene
Dr. Alwash, an Iraqi surgeon who was once a refugee himself, visits a patient who was wounded in his arm, chest, and leg. “All our patients are newly injured in this conflict,” he says, usually by bombs or gunshots. “Our work mainly concentrates first on saving lives—surgical procedures that can save lives or save limbs.” Coming next week: “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene

Dr. Alwash, an Iraqi surgeon who was once a refugee himself, visits a patient who was wounded in his arm, chest, and leg. “All our patients are newly injured in this conflict,” he says, usually by bombs or gunshots. “Our work mainly concentrates first on saving lives—surgical procedures that can save lives or save limbs.” Coming next week: “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor
Patients wait for medical treatment at MSF’s clinic in the Domeez camp for Syrian refugees in Northern Iraq. There are at least 58,000 Syrians living here, waiting to go back home. Coming next week: “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor

Patients wait for medical treatment at MSF’s clinic in the Domeez camp for Syrian refugees in Northern Iraq. There are at least 58,000 Syrians living here, waiting to go back home. Coming next week: “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Mario Travaini
“I was the only midwife on the day Sedra’s mother came to MSF’s hospital in Syria,” says Amanda Godballe, a Danish midwife for MSF. “She was only six months pregnant, but the delivery had already begun. She was expecting her first children – two twin girls. There was no way to stop the delivery as it was already too far along. In our hospital we had very limited possibilities of taking care of premature babies. We had no pediatricians, incubators, or medicine to treat babies this premature. And as I was the only midwife at the hospital that day I had to do some creative thinking, especially because I knew that the children were likely to need resuscitation to stabilize them enough to be transferred to a more fully equipped hospital over the border, where treatment was possible.”
“I got my Belgian co-worker and nurse to help me in the delivery room, although she had never assisted with a delivery before. But inexperienced hands are better than no hands! At the same time I had my good Syrian colleague to help me and also an interpreter.” 
“Both children were quickly born. First Sedra – bottom first – and then her sister – also with her bottom first. They each weighed about 1,200 grams. Sedra was reasonably well stabilized with the help of an oxygen mask and an electric radiator to keep her warm. Unfortunately, her sister did not do as well. She died only 30 minutes old. Sedra was transferred to the border, in one of MSF’s ambulances, along with her mother. And there I was, in the backseat of an ambulance with a teeny tiny vulnerable human being, who had so many odds stacked against her. At the border we had to wait, and when the medics finally came I had to hand them the small bundle across the barbed wire fence, drive back to our makeshift hospital, and hope for the best.”

Photo by Mario Travaini

“I was the only midwife on the day Sedra’s mother came to MSF’s hospital in Syria,” says Amanda Godballe, a Danish midwife for MSF. “She was only six months pregnant, but the delivery had already begun. She was expecting her first children – two twin girls. There was no way to stop the delivery as it was already too far along. In our hospital we had very limited possibilities of taking care of premature babies. We had no pediatricians, incubators, or medicine to treat babies this premature. And as I was the only midwife at the hospital that day I had to do some creative thinking, especially because I knew that the children were likely to need resuscitation to stabilize them enough to be transferred to a more fully equipped hospital over the border, where treatment was possible.”

“I got my Belgian co-worker and nurse to help me in the delivery room, although she had never assisted with a delivery before. But inexperienced hands are better than no hands! At the same time I had my good Syrian colleague to help me and also an interpreter.” 

“Both children were quickly born. First Sedra – bottom first – and then her sister – also with her bottom first. They each weighed about 1,200 grams. Sedra was reasonably well stabilized with the help of an oxygen mask and an electric radiator to keep her warm. Unfortunately, her sister did not do as well. She died only 30 minutes old. Sedra was transferred to the border, in one of MSF’s ambulances, along with her mother. And there I was, in the backseat of an ambulance with a teeny tiny vulnerable human being, who had so many odds stacked against her. At the border we had to wait, and when the medics finally came I had to hand them the small bundle across the barbed wire fence, drive back to our makeshift hospital, and hope for the best.”

Thank you for support in 2013. Our medical teams were challenged by crises all over the world last year. Watch this short video to see what your support allowed us to do.

From the series MSF in 2013:
“At one point, we operated for 40 hours with only one two-hour break. Then we slept for three hours, and operated for another 12 hours after that.”—Dr. John de Csepel, Doctors Without Borders trauma surgeon in SyriaAn MSF surgeon operates on a patient in an inflatable operating theatre set up inside a converted chicken farm in Syria. Photo © Robin Meldrum/MSF

From the series MSF in 2013:

“At one point, we operated for 40 hours with only one two-hour break. Then we slept for three hours, and operated for another 12 hours after that.”
—Dr. John de Csepel, Doctors Without Borders trauma surgeon in Syria
An MSF surgeon operates on a patient in an inflatable operating theatre set up inside a converted chicken farm in Syria. Photo © Robin Meldrum/MSF

Photo by Pierre-Yves Bernard/MSF
Mental health needs among Syrian refugees are steadily increasing. In Domeez camp, Iraq, “disorders such as schizophrenia and severe depression are becoming more commonplace, and we are seeing many patients who have suicidal tendencies.” MSF psychologists and counselors have worked here along with medical staff for over a year now. Read more: http://bit.ly/1bcvJm3

Photo by Pierre-Yves Bernard/MSF

Mental health needs among Syrian refugees are steadily increasing. In Domeez camp, Iraq, “disorders such as schizophrenia and severe depression are becoming more commonplace, and we are seeing many patients who have suicidal tendencies.” MSF psychologists and counselors have worked here along with medical staff for over a year now. Read more: http://bit.ly/1bcvJm3

"Most diplomatic discussion on Syria has focused on the recent chemical weapons attack … Meanwhile, the residents of this area continue to face daily bombings and a blockade that deprives them of the food and medicines that they need to survive. And humanitarian assistance is not even on the agenda of international negotiations." - MSF op-ed, published Sept. 17 http://bit.ly/19hy5yo

"Most diplomatic discussion on Syria has focused on the recent chemical weapons attack … Meanwhile, the residents of this area continue to face daily bombings and a blockade that deprives them of the food and medicines that they need to survive. And humanitarian assistance is not even on the agenda of international negotiations." - MSF op-ed, published Sept. 17 http://bit.ly/19hy5yo

An MSF nurse tries to make a young patient smile in the ER of one of MSF’s makeshift hospitals in Syria. “We work as a beehive,” said one of the Syrian nurses. “Not only war-related cases are admitted, the hospital also receives normal medical cases, such as flu or medical emergencies, pediatrics—everything, even blood transfers. It’s similar to any regular hospital.” Before the current war, Syrians used to have access to good quality health care; now MSF is trying to help fill the enormous gaps.
Photo by Robin Meldrum/MSF

An MSF nurse tries to make a young patient smile in the ER of one of MSF’s makeshift hospitals in Syria. “We work as a beehive,” said one of the Syrian nurses. “Not only war-related cases are admitted, the hospital also receives normal medical cases, such as flu or medical emergencies, pediatrics—everything, even blood transfers. It’s similar to any regular hospital.” Before the current war, Syrians used to have access to good quality health care; now MSF is trying to help fill the enormous gaps.

Photo by Robin Meldrum/MSF