Posts tagged Photojournalsim

Photo:This nine-month-old baby was recently diagnosed with MDR-TB. There is no guidance from the World Health Organization on the best way to treat children with drug-resistant TB. Nurses have to cut adult-formulation pills, which is imprecise and creates a greater risk of over- or under-dosing the child. Kyrgyzstan 2013 © Vincent Tremeau
Surviving Two Years of Treatment for Drug-Resistant TB in Kyrgyzstan
MSF works in the penitentiary and civilian sectors in Kyrgyzstan offering treatment for multi-drug resistant TB. In February 2012, MSF began offering comprehensive medical care for people with drug-resistant TB and people co-infected with HIV and TB in the district of Kara-Suu, southwestern Kyrgyzstan, where the rates of drug-resistant strains of TB are particularly high. Teams also offer psycho-social support to encourage adherence to the arduous two-year treatment program. While the team has helped renovate the TB hospital in Kara Suu to improve infection control, the aim is to enable patients to be treated on an outpatient basis, at clinics closer to home.

Photo:This nine-month-old baby was recently diagnosed with MDR-TB. There is no guidance from the World Health Organization on the best way to treat children with drug-resistant TB. Nurses have to cut adult-formulation pills, which is imprecise and creates a greater risk of over- or under-dosing the child. Kyrgyzstan 2013 © Vincent Tremeau

Surviving Two Years of Treatment for Drug-Resistant TB in Kyrgyzstan

MSF works in the penitentiary and civilian sectors in Kyrgyzstan offering treatment for multi-drug resistant TB. In February 2012, MSF began offering comprehensive medical care for people with drug-resistant TB and people co-infected with HIV and TB in the district of Kara-Suu, southwestern Kyrgyzstan, where the rates of drug-resistant strains of TB are particularly high. Teams also offer psycho-social support to encourage adherence to the arduous two-year treatment program. While the team has helped renovate the TB hospital in Kara Suu to improve infection control, the aim is to enable patients to be treated on an outpatient basis, at clinics closer to home.

Photo: A young cholera patient at an MSF facility. Haiti 2012 © Emilie Régnier
Haiti: Deplorable Conditions for Cholera Patients

Photo: A young cholera patient at an MSF facility. Haiti 2012 © Emilie Régnier

Haiti: Deplorable Conditions for Cholera Patients

Photos: DRC 2013 © Tristan Pfund/MSF

Fighting a Years-Long Measles Epidemic in Congo

The measles epidemic has spread to areas recently hit by a malaria outbreak between May and September 2012, causing exceptionally high mortality rates among children under five years old. MSF teams launched its intervention in March 2012 to vaccinate and treat people who don’t have access to healthcare. MSF teams provide supplies to health care facilities and train medical staff and community health works to reach the most distant communities.

Photo: An MSF clinic in Kitchanga, North Kivu. DRC 2009 © Michael Goldfarb
DRC: North Kivu Fighting Damages Health Structures and Displaces Thousands
Amid fighting in the town of Kitchanga in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), which has caused widespread casualties and damage to health facilities, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is mobilizing medical resources to the affected area, the organization said today. More than 55 civilians have reportedly been killed in the fighting, and 135 people wounded. Shelling also struck St. Benoit Hospital in Kitchanga today, killing two people and wounding eight. Many homes and other buildings have been burned, including the MSF compound. Thousands of civilians have fled. “We call upon all parties to the conflict to respect the neutrality of health structures,” said Hugues Robert, MSF’s head of mission for North Kivu province. “MSF is very concerned about the plight of civilians during intense periods of fighting like this. All parties to the conflict should not harm the population.” Several MSF Congolese staff members were displaced from their homes by the fighting, and widespread panic and fear is gripping the population as tensions between communities in the region escalate. Reaching Kitchanga is extremely difficult. An MSF surgeon, anesthetist, nurse, and emergency logistician arrived by helicopter yesterday to provide additional support to an MSF medical team based in the town. Dressing kits, surgery kits, medicine, plastic sheeting, and tents were also delivered. Several wounded people were also transferred to the North Kivu town of Mweso and to the provincial capital, Goma, for further treatment.

Photo: An MSF clinic in Kitchanga, North Kivu. DRC 2009 © Michael Goldfarb

DRC: North Kivu Fighting Damages Health Structures and Displaces Thousands

Amid fighting in the town of Kitchanga in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), which has caused widespread casualties and damage to health facilities, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is mobilizing medical resources to the affected area, the organization said today. More than 55 civilians have reportedly been killed in the fighting, and 135 people wounded. Shelling also struck St. Benoit Hospital in Kitchanga today, killing two people and wounding eight. Many homes and other buildings have been burned, including the MSF compound. Thousands of civilians have fled. “We call upon all parties to the conflict to respect the neutrality of health structures,” said Hugues Robert, MSF’s head of mission for North Kivu province. “MSF is very concerned about the plight of civilians during intense periods of fighting like this. All parties to the conflict should not harm the population.” Several MSF Congolese staff members were displaced from their homes by the fighting, and widespread panic and fear is gripping the population as tensions between communities in the region escalate. Reaching Kitchanga is extremely difficult. An MSF surgeon, anesthetist, nurse, and emergency logistician arrived by helicopter yesterday to provide additional support to an MSF medical team based in the town. Dressing kits, surgery kits, medicine, plastic sheeting, and tents were also delivered. Several wounded people were also transferred to the North Kivu town of Mweso and to the provincial capital, Goma, for further treatment.

Photo: MSF doctor Susanna Ericsson examines a young patient. DRC 2013 © MSF
Letter from Shamwana, Democratic Republic of Congo
MSF doctor,Susanna Ericsson works in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where ongoing fighting between government forces and Mai-Mai militias in Katanga province has forced thousands of people to flee into the surrounding bush fearing for their lives. Here, Dr. Ericsson describes the experience of one such patient.
Our patient arrived early in the morning the day after we removed all non-essential staff from the project. She was the first person to be taken care of by our emergency “skeleton” team.
She was 23 years old, and came from a small village called Kilenge that has no health care facilities at all. The village is 25 kilometers [about 15 miles] from Kafumbe, where there is a small health post. There has not been anybody working at the health post for a long time because of the fighting and because there is a lack of health personnel and medicines in this region.
The patient had started getting abdominal pains at home, and got worried as she was already late in her pregnancy. She went over to her mother’s house and a traditional birthing attendant and a traditional healer were called for. For three days this woman drank concoctions of different herbs and the traditional healer gave her some physical exercises to do to get the baby out.
On the fourth day, the baby still hadn’t been born and her family was very worried as she had developed fever, smelled very bad, and the pain was worse than ever. At 3:00 am that morning the family set out for Shamwana where MSF runs a hospital offering free medical care to all.
It took the family 48 hours to reach MSF’s hospital on foot. The patient was transported on a bicycle, and 10 men and 4 women came along as protection, since the roads are not safe, and they were worried about an ambush.
Upon arrival at the hospital in Shamwana the patient immediately went into emergency surgery. A serious infection had already spread though her body and her baby had died. There is no doubt that without the surgery provided by MSF, the woman would not have survived. 

Photo: MSF doctor Susanna Ericsson examines a young patient. DRC 2013 © MSF

Letter from Shamwana, Democratic Republic of Congo

MSF doctor,Susanna Ericsson works in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where ongoing fighting between government forces and Mai-Mai militias in Katanga province has forced thousands of people to flee into the surrounding bush fearing for their lives. Here, Dr. Ericsson describes the experience of one such patient.

Our patient arrived early in the morning the day after we removed all non-essential staff from the project. She was the first person to be taken care of by our emergency “skeleton” team.

She was 23 years old, and came from a small village called Kilenge that has no health care facilities at all. The village is 25 kilometers [about 15 miles] from Kafumbe, where there is a small health post. There has not been anybody working at the health post for a long time because of the fighting and because there is a lack of health personnel and medicines in this region.

The patient had started getting abdominal pains at home, and got worried as she was already late in her pregnancy. She went over to her mother’s house and a traditional birthing attendant and a traditional healer were called for. For three days this woman drank concoctions of different herbs and the traditional healer gave her some physical exercises to do to get the baby out.

On the fourth day, the baby still hadn’t been born and her family was very worried as she had developed fever, smelled very bad, and the pain was worse than ever. At 3:00 am that morning the family set out for Shamwana where MSF runs a hospital offering free medical care to all.

It took the family 48 hours to reach MSF’s hospital on foot. The patient was transported on a bicycle, and 10 men and 4 women came along as protection, since the roads are not safe, and they were worried about an ambush.

Upon arrival at the hospital in Shamwana the patient immediately went into emergency surgery. A serious infection had already spread though her body and her baby had died. There is no doubt that without the surgery provided by MSF, the woman would not have survived. 

Photo: Displaced people bathe at a water pump in a camp outside Sittwe in Rakhine state. Myanmar 2013 © Kaung Htet
Myanmar: Violence and Intimidation Leave Tens of Thousands Without Medical Care
Eight months after deadly communal clashes broke out in Myanmar’s Rakhine state, tens of thousands of people are still unable to access urgently needed medical care.
MSF calls on government authorities and community leaders to ensure that all people of Rakhine can live without fear of violence, abuse and harassment, and that humanitarian organizations can assist those most in need.
“It is among people living in makeshift camps in rice fields or other crowded strips of land that MSF is seeing the most acute medical needs,” said Arjan Hehenkamp, MSF general director. “Ongoing insecurity and repeated threats and intimidation by a small but vocal group within the Rakhine community have severely impacted on our ability to deliver lifesaving medical care.”

Photo: Displaced people bathe at a water pump in a camp outside Sittwe in Rakhine state. Myanmar 2013 © Kaung Htet

Myanmar: Violence and Intimidation Leave Tens of Thousands Without Medical Care

Eight months after deadly communal clashes broke out in Myanmar’s Rakhine state, tens of thousands of people are still unable to access urgently needed medical care.

MSF calls on government authorities and community leaders to ensure that all people of Rakhine can live without fear of violence, abuse and harassment, and that humanitarian organizations can assist those most in need.

“It is among people living in makeshift camps in rice fields or other crowded strips of land that MSF is seeing the most acute medical needs,” said Arjan Hehenkamp, MSF general director. “Ongoing insecurity and repeated threats and intimidation by a small but vocal group within the Rakhine community have severely impacted on our ability to deliver lifesaving medical care.”

Photo: An MSF vehicle enters the front gate of the MSF trauma hospital in Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, November 29, 2011. Afghanistan 2011 © Michael Goldfarb
MSF Treats Victims of Kunduz Bomb Blast
Five people were dead on arrival and two others died during surgery. Of the 17 people treated by MSF, 11 suffered life-threatening injuries and were in critical condition. Almost all of the patients sustained blast-related injuries including fractures, head trauma, and abdominal and chest injuries requiring specialized trauma surgery.
“People rushed to the hospital after the explosion, seeking information and inquiring about their families and relatives, which is understandable,” said Aurelien Marechal, MSF Field Coordinator in Kunduz. “However, the hospital grounds were crowded, so we had to temporarily close the entrance in order to give space to the medical staff to provide urgent treatment.”
By launching a “multiple casualty plan,” which classifies patients according to the severity of their injuries, the medical team was able to identify and respond to the patients requiring immediate attention.
MSF has been running the surgical hospital in Kunduz since August 2011, providing emergency surgery and follow-up treatment for people wounded in conflict and for those suffering from other life-threatening injuries. A total of 10,000 people were treated in 2012.
In all locations where MSF works in Afghanistan, a strict no-weapons policy is implemented to ensure the safety and security of patients.
“No matter what is going on outside its gates, the hospital needs to remain a safe place for doctors to work and patients to receive lifesaving treatment,” said Marechal.

Photo: An MSF vehicle enters the front gate of the MSF trauma hospital in Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, November 29, 2011. Afghanistan 2011 © Michael Goldfarb

MSF Treats Victims of Kunduz Bomb Blast

Five people were dead on arrival and two others died during surgery. Of the 17 people treated by MSF, 11 suffered life-threatening injuries and were in critical condition. Almost all of the patients sustained blast-related injuries including fractures, head trauma, and abdominal and chest injuries requiring specialized trauma surgery.

“People rushed to the hospital after the explosion, seeking information and inquiring about their families and relatives, which is understandable,” said Aurelien Marechal, MSF Field Coordinator in Kunduz. “However, the hospital grounds were crowded, so we had to temporarily close the entrance in order to give space to the medical staff to provide urgent treatment.”

By launching a “multiple casualty plan,” which classifies patients according to the severity of their injuries, the medical team was able to identify and respond to the patients requiring immediate attention.

MSF has been running the surgical hospital in Kunduz since August 2011, providing emergency surgery and follow-up treatment for people wounded in conflict and for those suffering from other life-threatening injuries. A total of 10,000 people were treated in 2012.

In all locations where MSF works in Afghanistan, a strict no-weapons policy is implemented to ensure the safety and security of patients.

“No matter what is going on outside its gates, the hospital needs to remain a safe place for doctors to work and patients to receive lifesaving treatment,” said Marechal.

TELL CONGRESS TO IMPROVE FOOD AID FOR MALNOURISHED CHILDREN

Right now, the US Congress is considering changes to the Farm Bill, the law that dictates what kind of food aid assistance the US sends overseas. With better nutrition standards, US food aid could save more children suffering from malnutrition.TAKE ACTION! SIGN THE PETITION!photo: Burkina Faso © Jessica Dimmock

TELL CONGRESS TO IMPROVE FOOD AID FOR MALNOURISHED CHILDREN

Right now, the US Congress is considering changes to the Farm Bill, the law that dictates what kind of food aid assistance the US sends overseas. With better nutrition standards, US food aid could save more children suffering from malnutrition.

TAKE ACTION! SIGN THE PETITION!

photo: Burkina Faso © Jessica Dimmock

Sahel: As Likely Malnutrition Crisis Looms, MSF Prepares Short- And Long-Term Responses

A food crisis has been declared in the Sahelian Band of West Africa. UNICEF has estimated that up to 15 million people in six countries in the region are living with moderate or acute food insecurity. In a region where global acute childhood malnutrition rates regularly near the warning threshold of 10 percent, any factor that further reduces access to food can tip the situation into a full-blown nutritional crisis.

	Although MSF has not yet noted a significant increase in cases in most of its current nutritional programs, the organization did have to open new malnutrition treatment programs in Biltine and Yao, in Chad, where rates of acute malnutrition of 24 percent and 20 percent, respectively, have been reported. Teams are also evaluating the nutritional situation in other areas of Chad, as well as in Mali, Niger, Mauritania, and Senegal.

	“It is too soon to know the extent of the expected nutritional crisis,” says Stéphane Doyon, manager of MSF’s malnutrition campaign. “Traditionally, the most difficult period is still ahead, between May and July. However, we already project that hundreds of thousands of children will suffer from acute severe malnutrition, as they do every year in this region.”Photo: Chad 2011 © Alfons Rodriguez
An MSF staff member measures the mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) of a child with severe acute malnutrition in Chad.

Sahel: As Likely Malnutrition Crisis Looms, MSF Prepares Short- And Long-Term Responses

A food crisis has been declared in the Sahelian Band of West Africa. UNICEF has estimated that up to 15 million people in six countries in the region are living with moderate or acute food insecurity. In a region where global acute childhood malnutrition rates regularly near the warning threshold of 10 percent, any factor that further reduces access to food can tip the situation into a full-blown nutritional crisis.

Although MSF has not yet noted a significant increase in cases in most of its current nutritional programs, the organization did have to open new malnutrition treatment programs in Biltine and Yao, in Chad, where rates of acute malnutrition of 24 percent and 20 percent, respectively, have been reported. Teams are also evaluating the nutritional situation in other areas of Chad, as well as in Mali, Niger, Mauritania, and Senegal.

“It is too soon to know the extent of the expected nutritional crisis,” says Stéphane Doyon, manager of MSF’s malnutrition campaign. “Traditionally, the most difficult period is still ahead, between May and July. However, we already project that hundreds of thousands of children will suffer from acute severe malnutrition, as they do every year in this region.”

Photo: Chad 2011 © Alfons Rodriguez
An MSF staff member measures the mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) of a child with severe acute malnutrition in Chad.