Posts tagged Interview

"The experience changed me completely; my innocence died there." Twenty years ago, Rachel Kiddell-Monroe was head of mission in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) during and after the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Here she talks about MSF’s response during the genocide and how the aid response and success in Rwanda should serve as a model for DRC’s North Kivu Province just over the border. 

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Free Speech Radio News | In Syria

Listen to an FSRN interview in which MSF head of mission Kassia Queen describes the dire humanitarian situation in northern Syria—how fighting over territories blocks access to vital medicines and health services.

LISTEN NOW: NPR Interview In Syria, Addressing Medical Needs in an Embattled City
Nearly two years after the crisis in Syria began, the humanitarian situation in the country remains dire. Shinjiro Murata, head of our mission in northern Syria, talks to NPR about our efforts to address the growing medical needs.

LISTEN NOW: NPR Interview In Syria, Addressing Medical Needs in an Embattled City

Nearly two years after the crisis in Syria began, the humanitarian situation in the country remains dire. Shinjiro Murata, head of our mission in northern Syria, talks to NPR about our efforts to address the growing medical needs.

Photo: Patients queue in Moïssala District’s Bouna health zone, where MSF has been employing seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC). Chad 2012 © Estrella Lasry

Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention: “A Powerful Weapon in the Fight Against Malaria”

A large-scale malaria prevention program, consisting of intermittent distributions of anti-malaria medicines, appears to be drastically reducing the number of new cases of the disease among young children during peak transmission season.

Dr. Estrella Lasry, an MSF Tropical Medicine Adviser, says “these are encouraging results, and we now have to measure their impact in collaboration with research institutes and epidemiologists.” Read more from the interview with Dr. Lasry.

Photo: Patients queue in Moïssala District’s Bouna health zone, where MSF has been employing seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC). Chad 2012 © Estrella Lasry

Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention: “A Powerful Weapon in the Fight Against Malaria”

A large-scale malaria prevention program, consisting of intermittent distributions of anti-malaria medicines, appears to be drastically reducing the number of new cases of the disease among young children during peak transmission season.

Dr. Estrella Lasry, an MSF Tropical Medicine Adviser, says “these are encouraging results, and we now have to measure their impact in collaboration with research institutes and epidemiologists.” Read more from the interview with Dr. Lasry.

Listen to NPR’s report on the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo. MSF’s Alfonso Verdu and Armand Sprecher are interviewed on the challenges that health care workers face in responding to it.

AID WORKER PROFILES
Name: Gerry Bashein
Role: Anesthesiologist
From: Seattle, Washington
Age: 68Describe the different roles and responsibilities in your assignments? Did you work outside of your specialty? 

Anesthesia for general surgery was a part of each assignment, but some missions included a significant proportion of obstetrics—in Liberia, Sudan, and Sri Lanka—or trauma—in Nigeria, and Indonesia. In Indonesia, I was also in charge of the intensive care unit for both medical and surgical patients. In Sri Lanka, I provided relief coverage for the emergency room doctor.What did you find most challenging about your work? 

I had to deal with illnesses that I don’t normally handle as an anesthesiologist in the U.S. The lack of lab facilities, x-ray, and specialists to discuss medical issues with presented different challenges. Without a lab to do bacterial cultures and other tests and measurements, we gave antibiotics, fluids, electrolytes, etc. empirically. Blood was always in short supply. There was limited or no banked blood. I lost a patient who had a pelvic fracture because we couldn’t get blood in time.Read the rest of Dr. Gerry Bashein’s interview.photo: 2012 © MSF

AID WORKER PROFILES Name: Gerry Bashein
Role: Anesthesiologist
From: Seattle, Washington
Age: 68


Describe the different roles and responsibilities in your assignments? Did you work outside of your specialty?

Anesthesia for general surgery was a part of each assignment, but some missions included a significant proportion of obstetrics—in Liberia, Sudan, and Sri Lanka—or trauma—in Nigeria, and Indonesia. In Indonesia, I was also in charge of the intensive care unit for both medical and surgical patients. In Sri Lanka, I provided relief coverage for the emergency room doctor.

What did you find most challenging about your work?

I had to deal with illnesses that I don’t normally handle as an anesthesiologist in the U.S. The lack of lab facilities, x-ray, and specialists to discuss medical issues with presented different challenges. Without a lab to do bacterial cultures and other tests and measurements, we gave antibiotics, fluids, electrolytes, etc. empirically. Blood was always in short supply. There was limited or no banked blood. I lost a patient who had a pelvic fracture because we couldn’t get blood in time.

Read the rest of Dr. Gerry Bashein’s interview.

photo: 2012 © MSF

publicradiointernational:

Somalia, September 2011. (Photo: Yann Libessart/MSF)
Doctors without Borders is one of the few aid groups that works in  areas of Somalia controlled by al-Shabab militants.   The aid group has just  released a new book about the complexities of that sort of work.  It’s  called:  Humanitarian Negotiations Revealed. 
Duncan Mclean helps manage the group’s work in Somalia.  He says that  the hospital Doctors Without Borders operates on the outskirts of  Mogadishu treats any injured individual, including al-Shabab fighters.
“A certain degree of that aid that we’re providing will be used for  other ends than what we intended it to be,”  Mclean said. “And it would  be naïve to consider otherwise, to maintain this idealistic image of  aid work.”
Full interview with Mclean here.

publicradiointernational:

Somalia, September 2011. (Photo: Yann Libessart/MSF)

Doctors without Borders is one of the few aid groups that works in areas of Somalia controlled by al-Shabab militants. The aid group has just released a new book about the complexities of that sort of work. It’s called: Humanitarian Negotiations Revealed.

Duncan Mclean helps manage the group’s work in Somalia. He says that the hospital Doctors Without Borders operates on the outskirts of Mogadishu treats any injured individual, including al-Shabab fighters.

“A certain degree of that aid that we’re providing will be used for other ends than what we intended it to be,” Mclean said. “And it would be naïve to consider otherwise, to maintain this idealistic image of aid work.”

Full interview with Mclean here.

Libya: MSF Suspends Work in Misrata Detention Centers

Doctors Without Borders staff treating patients in Misrata detention centers suspended medical activities when it became clear that the patients were being tortured.

Learn more about the situation in Libya.

"Doctors Without Borders suspended its work in the Libyan city of Misrata last week because prison officials repeatedly brought torture victims in for treatment — only to return them to interrogation after they received medical care. SPIEGEL spoke with the group’s general director, Christopher Stokes, about the situation in Libya."

__________________________________________
“SPIEGEL: Your organization has suspended operations in Misrata. Why?

Stokes: Because some officials have sought to exploit and obstruct our medical work. Our mission was to treat war-wounded detainees. Since then, doctors from Doctors Without Borders were increasingly confronted with patients who suffered injuries caused by torture during interrogation sessions. In total, we treated 115 people who had torture-related wounds, Libyans and foreigners from African countries whom they accuse of having been mercenaries for Gadhafi’s regime.

SPIEGEL: How were the prisoners tortured?

Stokes: We have encountered bone fractures as a result of torture and we received patients who had been electrically shocked.”

__________________________________________

Read the whole interview with SPIEGEL here.

Read the MSF Press Release here.

Photo: Benoit Finck © MSF

"Doctors Without Borders suspended its work in the Libyan city of Misrata last week because prison officials repeatedly brought torture victims in for treatment — only to return them to interrogation after they received medical care. SPIEGEL spoke with the group’s general director, Christopher Stokes, about the situation in Libya."

__________________________________________
SPIEGEL: Your organization has suspended operations in Misrata. Why?

Stokes: Because some officials have sought to exploit and obstruct our medical work. Our mission was to treat war-wounded detainees. Since then, doctors from Doctors Without Borders were increasingly confronted with patients who suffered injuries caused by torture during interrogation sessions. In total, we treated 115 people who had torture-related wounds, Libyans and foreigners from African countries whom they accuse of having been mercenaries for Gadhafi’s regime.

SPIEGEL: How were the prisoners tortured?

Stokes: We have encountered bone fractures as a result of torture and we received patients who had been electrically shocked.”

__________________________________________


Read the whole interview with SPIEGEL here.


Read the MSF Press Release here.


Photo: Benoit Finck © MSF

Al Jazeera hosts a discussion on “Neglected Tropical Diseases” (NTD)

Is private funding of pharmaceutical drugs the only way to ensure access to treatment for the world’s poorest patients?

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“I welcome the continuous donations by the pharmaceutical industry but I would really challenge them to do more in research and development. We know that only one per cent of drugs developed since the mid-1970s have been for all the tropical diseases and Tuberculosis put together, let alone the NTD.”

- Tido von Schoen-Angerer,
the director of the MSF Access Campaign
——————————————————-

Read the corresponding article here.

MSF’s Michael Neuman will be on WNYC’s Leonard Lopate Show today at noon, exploring the practical realities of conducting humanitarian negotiations in complex situations. He’s the editor of, Humanitarian Negotiations Revealed: The MSF Experience published on the occasion of MSF’s 40th anniversary, which addresses the evolution of humanitarian goals, the resistance to these goals, and the political arrangements that overcame (or failed to) this resistance. 

Tune in today at noon to listen live.Click here to listen to the archived show later.

MSF’s Michael Neuman will be on WNYC’s Leonard Lopate Show today at noon, exploring the practical realities of conducting humanitarian negotiations in complex situations. He’s the editor of, Humanitarian Negotiations Revealed: The MSF Experience published on the occasion of MSF’s 40th anniversary, which addresses the evolution of humanitarian goals, the resistance to these goals, and the political arrangements that overcame (or failed to) this resistance.

Tune in today at noon to listen live.
Click here to listen to the archived show later.

MSF’s Access Campaign Pharmacist Janice Lee talked about the latest version of the Untangling the Web of ARV Price Reductions report.

Haiti: “If She Does Not Drink, She Will Die”

Interview with Michelle Mays, an MSF nurse back from Haiti, who recounts what she saw, what was accomplished & what remains to be done.