Posts tagged Humanitarian

MSF was deeply saddened to learn of the tragic death of Dr. Richard Rockefeller, who was killed today in a plane crash. MSF extends its deepest sympathies and condolences to his family. Dr. Rockefeller was instrumental to the founding of MSF in the United States. He served as chair of the Board of Advisors of MSF-USA for 21 years, leveraging his credibility within the philanthropic community to garner the financial support that was so critical to ensuring MSF’s continued financial independence. While leading this advisory committee and visiting MSF programs abroad, including those in Cambodia, Malawi, Niger, Thailand, and Cambodia, Dr. Rockefeller also worked as a field doctor in Peru and in northern Nigeria while a massive meningitis outbreak struck the country in 2009. Read more: http://bit.ly/1scvvYb

MSF was deeply saddened to learn of the tragic death of Dr. Richard Rockefeller, who was killed today in a plane crash. MSF extends its deepest sympathies and condolences to his family. Dr. Rockefeller was instrumental to the founding of MSF in the United States. He served as chair of the Board of Advisors of MSF-USA for 21 years, leveraging his credibility within the philanthropic community to garner the financial support that was so critical to ensuring MSF’s continued financial independence. While leading this advisory committee and visiting MSF programs abroad, including those in Cambodia, Malawi, Niger, Thailand, and Cambodia, Dr. Rockefeller also worked as a field doctor in Peru and in northern Nigeria while a massive meningitis outbreak struck the country in 2009. Read more: http://bit.ly/1scvvYb

"The experience changed me completely; my innocence died there." Twenty years ago, Rachel Kiddell-Monroe was head of mission in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) during and after the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Here she talks about MSF’s response during the genocide and how the aid response and success in Rwanda should serve as a model for DRC’s North Kivu Province just over the border. 

Today marks 20 years since the Rwandan genocide during which approximately 800,000 people lost their lives. Many MSF staff were among the dead. For the first time MSF is sharing its internal communications during the genocide and its aftermath with the public. These reports depict the struggles and humanitarian dilemmas that the organization faced internally. See MSF’s Speaking Out Case Studies: http://speakingout.msf.org/en/genocide-of-rwandan-tutsi

Today marks 20 years since the Rwandan genocide during which approximately 800,000 people lost their lives. Many MSF staff were among the dead. For the first time MSF is sharing its internal communications during the genocide and its aftermath with the public. These reports depict the struggles and humanitarian dilemmas that the organization faced internally. See MSF’s Speaking Out Case Studies: http://speakingout.msf.org/en/genocide-of-rwandan-tutsi

Join us on Reddit THURSDAY at 2pm EDT/6pm GMT to Ask Us Anything about drug-resistant TB. Kees Keus has managed MSF’s TB project in Swaziland for 4 years and Jezza Neumann directed the new FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, now available at pbs.org/frontline. This AMA is an opportunity to ask anything you want to know about drug-resistant TB. Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions

Join us on Reddit THURSDAY at 2pm EDT/6pm GMT to Ask Us Anything about drug-resistant TB. Kees Keus has managed MSF’s TB project in Swaziland for 4 years and Jezza Neumann directed the new FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, now available at pbs.org/frontline. This AMA is an opportunity to ask anything you want to know about drug-resistant TB. Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF
This past weekend, MSF treated 28 people injured during fighting in Bangui, Central African Republic. Of those patients, 16 were women and four were children, from babies up to 15 years old. Most injuries were caused by bullets and grenade shrapnel. Read the latest report:http://bit.ly/1mFMRZK

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

This past weekend, MSF treated 28 people injured during fighting in Bangui, Central African Republic. Of those patients, 16 were women and four were children, from babies up to 15 years old. Most injuries were caused by bullets and grenade shrapnel. Read the latest report:http://bit.ly/1mFMRZK

Today is World TB Day. Sign our TB Manifesto and help us demand better medicines and diagnostics for people with drug-resistant forms of the deadly disease: http://ow.ly/uN7mW 

Today is World TB Day. Sign our TB Manifesto and help us demand better medicines and diagnostics for people with drug-resistant forms of the deadly disease: http://ow.ly/uN7mW 

Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions
10-year-old Nokubegha is battling drug-resistant TB in Swaziland. He is featured in the FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, airing on PBS Tuesday, March 25. See the trailer: http://bit.ly/1d4KLzi 

Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions

10-year-old Nokubegha is battling drug-resistant TB in Swaziland. He is featured in the FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, airing on PBS Tuesday, March 25. See the trailer: http://bit.ly/1d4KLzi 

Photo by Samantha Maurin /MSF
The refugees, including many children, from CAR who’ve arrived seeking safety in Sido, Chad, have witnessed the worst atrocities. “Most of the refugees who told me their stories did so in a monotone, with solemn faces,” said an MSF psychiatrist, “without going into details about the bodies carved up in the massacres, keeping their distance from the expression of painful emotions.”http://bit.ly/1mfQyVR

Photo by Samantha Maurin /MSF

The refugees, including many children, from CAR who’ve arrived seeking safety in Sido, Chad, have witnessed the worst atrocities. “Most of the refugees who told me their stories did so in a monotone, with solemn faces,” said an MSF psychiatrist, “without going into details about the bodies carved up in the massacres, keeping their distance from the expression of painful emotions.”http://bit.ly/1mfQyVR

"I didn’t want to be another statistic of TB." Phumeza endured incredibly arduous treatment for her extensively drug-resistant TB. Now she is asking for better care for all TB patients. Sign the TB Manifesto:http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/Photo by Sydelle Willow Smith

"I didn’t want to be another statistic of TB." Phumeza endured incredibly arduous treatment for her extensively drug-resistant TB. Now she is asking for better care for all TB patients. Sign the TB Manifesto:http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/
Photo by Sydelle Willow Smith

With new, better drugs for his multidrug-resistant TB, Vardan is now able to be with his family instead of in and out of the hospital. “I am young. I am 60 years old. I am still useful to my community.” http://bit.ly/1if7CYg

Some 2.96 million people are currently displaced in DR Congo  and many of them have no access to humanitarian assistance. Many communities are cut off from medical care due to poor infrastructure, displacement and conflict, and adequate assistance is not being provided in rural and conflict-affected areas by aid organizations and by the state. At the same time, violence against civilians, medical staff and property is commonplace, and health care providers are regularly required to suspend operations, leaving people deprived of the medical care they urgently need. Read MSF’s report, “Everyday Emergency: Silent Suffering in Democratic Republic of Congo”: http://bit.ly/1mT34fk

Some 2.96 million people are currently displaced in DR Congo  and many of them have no access to humanitarian assistance. Many communities are cut off from medical care due to poor infrastructure, displacement and conflict, and adequate assistance is not being provided in rural and conflict-affected areas by aid organizations and by the state. At the same time, violence against civilians, medical staff and property is commonplace, and health care providers are regularly required to suspend operations, leaving people deprived of the medical care they urgently need. Read MSF’s report, “Everyday Emergency: Silent Suffering in Democratic Republic of Congo”: http://bit.ly/1mT34fk

"I was shot, even though I wasn’t fighting anyone or committing any crime." - Munyasadimana, a displaced man in Mgunga camp, DRC. Hear the stories of some of the 2.96 million people currently displaced in that country. After 20 years of fighting, a lack of medical assistance and other needs, many displaced Congolese experience "Everyday violence".




 

Photo © Mikhail Galustov
Sardar (sitting), 34, is from Nahri Saraj district of Helmand province. After a car accident, he received poor treatment at a local health facility during which a doctor removed synovial liquid from his knee. It has left him unable to walk and in need of complex, costly surgery available only in Kabul. Even if he can borrow the money to pay for the procedure, there is no guarantee that it will work. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo © Mikhail Galustov

Sardar (sitting), 34, is from Nahri Saraj district of Helmand province. After a car accident, he received poor treatment at a local health facility during which a doctor removed synovial liquid from his knee. It has left him unable to walk and in need of complex, costly surgery available only in Kabul. Even if he can borrow the money to pay for the procedure, there is no guarantee that it will work. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo © Mikhail Galustov

Najibullah (left) waits for a check-up at MSF’s Kunduz Trauma Centre in northern Afghanistan. The father of 11 was shot in the leg when a firefight broke out near the construction site he was working on. The police closed off the surrounding roads and his relatives couldn’t take him to the hospital until the fighting stopped the next morning. When he finally reached a doctor, he had lost a great deal of blood and was in a critical condition. He is one of many Afghans who cannot access emergency medical care because security problems make it to dangerous to travel at night. Injuries like Najibullah’s get much worse; his leg had to be amputated. Women enduring complicated labor suffer excessively, and sometimes die. Families can only keep “death watches” over relatives overnight, hoping they survive until morning, when it might be safer to try to reach a doctor. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo © Mikhail Galustov

Najibullah (left) waits for a check-up at MSF’s Kunduz Trauma Centre in northern Afghanistan. The father of 11 was shot in the leg when a firefight broke out near the construction site he was working on. The police closed off the surrounding roads and his relatives couldn’t take him to the hospital until the fighting stopped the next morning. When he finally reached a doctor, he had lost a great deal of blood and was in a critical condition. He is one of many Afghans who cannot access emergency medical care because security problems make it to dangerous to travel at night. Injuries like Najibullah’s get much worse; his leg had to be amputated. Women enduring complicated labor suffer excessively, and sometimes die. Families can only keep “death watches” over relatives overnight, hoping they survive until morning, when it might be safer to try to reach a doctor. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo by © Andrea Bruce/Noor Images

A woman sits with her week-old child, who was born in this very same mud home where they live in a camp for displaced people on Kabul’s outskirts. The mother says she has been bleeding continually since the birth and still cannot stand. Without skilled medical help, women who deliver at home are at greater risk of illness or death if they face complications. Since the early 2000s, the population of Kabul has grown from three to five million people, with a constant flow of people arriving seeking safety or economic opportunity. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo by © Andrea Bruce/Noor Images

A woman sits with her week-old child, who was born in this very same mud home where they live in a camp for displaced people on Kabul’s outskirts. The mother says she has been bleeding continually since the birth and still cannot stand. Without skilled medical help, women who deliver at home are at greater risk of illness or death if they face complications. Since the early 2000s, the population of Kabul has grown from three to five million people, with a constant flow of people arriving seeking safety or economic opportunity. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh