Posts tagged Doctors Without Borders




 

Photo © Mikhail Galustov
Sardar (sitting), 34, is from Nahri Saraj district of Helmand province. After a car accident, he received poor treatment at a local health facility during which a doctor removed synovial liquid from his knee. It has left him unable to walk and in need of complex, costly surgery available only in Kabul. Even if he can borrow the money to pay for the procedure, there is no guarantee that it will work. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo © Mikhail Galustov

Sardar (sitting), 34, is from Nahri Saraj district of Helmand province. After a car accident, he received poor treatment at a local health facility during which a doctor removed synovial liquid from his knee. It has left him unable to walk and in need of complex, costly surgery available only in Kabul. Even if he can borrow the money to pay for the procedure, there is no guarantee that it will work. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo © Mikhail Galustov

Najibullah (left) waits for a check-up at MSF’s Kunduz Trauma Centre in northern Afghanistan. The father of 11 was shot in the leg when a firefight broke out near the construction site he was working on. The police closed off the surrounding roads and his relatives couldn’t take him to the hospital until the fighting stopped the next morning. When he finally reached a doctor, he had lost a great deal of blood and was in a critical condition. He is one of many Afghans who cannot access emergency medical care because security problems make it to dangerous to travel at night. Injuries like Najibullah’s get much worse; his leg had to be amputated. Women enduring complicated labor suffer excessively, and sometimes die. Families can only keep “death watches” over relatives overnight, hoping they survive until morning, when it might be safer to try to reach a doctor. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo © Mikhail Galustov

Najibullah (left) waits for a check-up at MSF’s Kunduz Trauma Centre in northern Afghanistan. The father of 11 was shot in the leg when a firefight broke out near the construction site he was working on. The police closed off the surrounding roads and his relatives couldn’t take him to the hospital until the fighting stopped the next morning. When he finally reached a doctor, he had lost a great deal of blood and was in a critical condition. He is one of many Afghans who cannot access emergency medical care because security problems make it to dangerous to travel at night. Injuries like Najibullah’s get much worse; his leg had to be amputated. Women enduring complicated labor suffer excessively, and sometimes die. Families can only keep “death watches” over relatives overnight, hoping they survive until morning, when it might be safer to try to reach a doctor. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo by © Andrea Bruce/Noor Images

A woman sits with her week-old child, who was born in this very same mud home where they live in a camp for displaced people on Kabul’s outskirts. The mother says she has been bleeding continually since the birth and still cannot stand. Without skilled medical help, women who deliver at home are at greater risk of illness or death if they face complications. Since the early 2000s, the population of Kabul has grown from three to five million people, with a constant flow of people arriving seeking safety or economic opportunity. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo by © Andrea Bruce/Noor Images

A woman sits with her week-old child, who was born in this very same mud home where they live in a camp for displaced people on Kabul’s outskirts. The mother says she has been bleeding continually since the birth and still cannot stand. Without skilled medical help, women who deliver at home are at greater risk of illness or death if they face complications. Since the early 2000s, the population of Kabul has grown from three to five million people, with a constant flow of people arriving seeking safety or economic opportunity. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo © Andrea Bruce/Noor Images

Chamangul’s mother uses her headscarf to fan away flies as her son Chamangul, 12, lies on a bed at the MSF-supported Ahmad Shah Baba hospital in eastern Kabul. He has the body of a boy half his age, but his head is swollen, wrapped in bandages. His mother brought him to MSF’s mobile clinic in Puli Charki, on Kabul’s outskirts, after being turned away from hospitals in the city. The MSF doctors say he suffers from an aggressive form of sarcoma that went untreated for too long and which has rotted most of his head, an ear and an eye. The doctors say they might have been able to help had they seen him earlier, but all they can do now is ease his pain. His mother is a widow who already lost two children to the same illness and now lives with her seven surviving children in a tent surrounded by other families displaced by violence in their home districts.

Photo © Andrea Bruce/Noor Images

Chamangul’s mother uses her headscarf to fan away flies as her son Chamangul, 12, lies on a bed at the MSF-supported Ahmad Shah Baba hospital in eastern Kabul. He has the body of a boy half his age, but his head is swollen, wrapped in bandages. His mother brought him to MSF’s mobile clinic in Puli Charki, on Kabul’s outskirts, after being turned away from hospitals in the city. The MSF doctors say he suffers from an aggressive form of sarcoma that went untreated for too long and which has rotted most of his head, an ear and an eye. The doctors say they might have been able to help had they seen him earlier, but all they can do now is ease his pain. His mother is a widow who already lost two children to the same illness and now lives with her seven surviving children in a tent surrounded by other families displaced by violence in their home districts.

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF
An MSF medical worker measures a displaced child for malnutrition. Muslim communities in many towns in western Central African Republic (CAR) have been attacked in recent weeks and residents have fled. In the town of Carnot, on several occasions, armed men entered the grounds of the city hospital where MSF is working, either in an attempt to kill patients or to attack displaced people living there. The hospital teams had to intervene each time. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF

An MSF medical worker measures a displaced child for malnutrition. Muslim communities in many towns in western Central African Republic (CAR) have been attacked in recent weeks and residents have fled. In the town of Carnot, on several occasions, armed men entered the grounds of the city hospital where MSF is working, either in an attempt to kill patients or to attack displaced people living there. The hospital teams had to intervene each time. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF
Anyone who hides Muslims from the anti-balaka militia is at risk in Carnot, Central African Republic (CAR). On February 7, an anti-Balaka group entered a house where 86 displaced Muslim men, women, and children were being hidden. Seven men were executed and three people were struck with a machete, including a 12-year-old child. After nearly two hours of very tense negotiations, MSF was able to gather the wounded and those requiring immediate medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF

Anyone who hides Muslims from the anti-balaka militia is at risk in Carnot, Central African Republic (CAR). On February 7, an anti-Balaka group entered a house where 86 displaced Muslim men, women, and children were being hidden. Seven men were executed and three people were struck with a machete, including a 12-year-old child. After nearly two hours of very tense negotiations, MSF was able to gather the wounded and those requiring immediate medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian
Displaced children take shelter in a church in Carnot, Central African Republic (CAR). Nearly 1,000 people, most of them Muslim, have been trapped, surrounded, and threatened by armed militias since Feb. 1 in this area of southwestern CAR. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian

Displaced children take shelter in a church in Carnot, Central African Republic (CAR). Nearly 1,000 people, most of them Muslim, have been trapped, surrounded, and threatened by armed militias since Feb. 1 in this area of southwestern CAR. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by William Daniels
MSF medical staff prepare an injured man to be moved across town from a camp to a hospital in Bangui, Central African Republic. Due to fighting between two main armed groups, many people in Bangui have been affected by extreme violence. Read more: http://bit.ly/1nqaSzY

Photo by William Daniels

MSF medical staff prepare an injured man to be moved across town from a camp to a hospital in Bangui, Central African Republic. Due to fighting between two main armed groups, many people in Bangui have been affected by extreme violence. Read more: http://bit.ly/1nqaSzY

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

Dorassio is 23. He is among the many victims of the inter-communal violence taking place in the Central African Republic today. On January 18, he was shot in the arm in Bouar, in the country’s Northwest region. His arm had to be amputated. He was treated by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Bouar, and then transferred by plane to the Bangui Community Hospital, where our surgical teams continue to monitor his condition. Here, Dorassio waits to be moved into the operating room at the Community Hospital. This will be his fifth operation since he arrived at the hospital.  

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

Dorassio is 23. He is among the many victims of the inter-communal violence taking place in the Central African Republic today. On January 18, he was shot in the arm in Bouar, in the country’s Northwest region. His arm had to be amputated. He was treated by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Bouar, and then transferred by plane to the Bangui Community Hospital, where our surgical teams continue to monitor his condition. Here, Dorassio waits to be moved into the operating room at the Community Hospital. This will be his fifth operation since he arrived at the hospital.  

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

The surgical team moves him into the operating room and places him on the operating table.

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

The surgical team moves him into the operating room and places him on the operating table.

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

Although the procedure lasts only 20 minutes, it is stressful for the patient. Dressing wounds is very painful and requires a general anesthetic so that the surgical team can clean the wound and change the dressing.  

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

Although the procedure lasts only 20 minutes, it is stressful for the patient. Dressing wounds is very painful and requires a general anesthetic so that the surgical team can clean the wound and change the dressing.  

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

Dorassio is in the recovery room for an hour, alongside MSF’s other surgical patients.  The surgical team will perform more than 10 operations over the course of the day. All of these patients are considered serious cases – whether in terms of their survival or continued functioning. Our surgical activities focus on victims of violence (including injuries from gunshots, knife attacks, grenade explosions and arrows). The patients’ prognosis for survival is often uncertain.

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

Dorassio is in the recovery room for an hour, alongside MSF’s other surgical patients.  The surgical team will perform more than 10 operations over the course of the day. All of these patients are considered serious cases – whether in terms of their survival or continued functioning. Our surgical activities focus on victims of violence (including injuries from gunshots, knife attacks, grenade explosions and arrows). The patients’ prognosis for survival is often uncertain.

   Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

MSF has been managing surgical emergencies at the Bangui Community Hospital in CAR since early December, treating an average of 140 patients every week. To address the inflow of patients in recent weeks, MSF teams have set up tents in the courtyard of the Community Hospital for patients receiving post-operative care. There are more than 80 patients here. The wait between treatment and surgery is often long. Dorassio is practicing writing with his other hand to become a writer and tell his story. 

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

MSF has been managing surgical emergencies at the Bangui Community Hospital in CAR since early December, treating an average of 140 patients every week. To address the inflow of patients in recent weeks, MSF teams have set up tents in the courtyard of the Community Hospital for patients receiving post-operative care. There are more than 80 patients here. The wait between treatment and surgery is often long. Dorassio is practicing writing with his other hand to become a writer and tell his story. 

Dr. Unni Karunakara started biking the entire length of India, from Srinagar in Kashmir to Thiruvanathapuram in Kerala, in October 2013. The former international president of MSF has now biked more than 3290 miles or 5300 km, having made many stops along the way to talk to medical students about health and humanitarianism. See photos and his blog UnniCycles:https://www.cycleformsf.in/unnicycles/

Dr. Unni Karunakara started biking the entire length of India, from Srinagar in Kashmir to Thiruvanathapuram in Kerala, in October 2013. The former international president of MSF has now biked more than 3290 miles or 5300 km, having made many stops along the way to talk to medical students about health and humanitarianism. See photos and his blog UnniCycles:https://www.cycleformsf.in/unnicycles/

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi
“Our teams have witnessed the consequences of extreme violence, including bullet wounds, maiming from attacks, and lynchings, which are daily realities in Bangui.” Read an update of MSF’s activities in Central African Republic:http://bit.ly/1ebCM36

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi

“Our teams have witnessed the consequences of extreme violence, including bullet wounds, maiming from attacks, and lynchings, which are daily realities in Bangui.” Read an update of MSF’s activities in Central African Republic:http://bit.ly/1ebCM36