Posts tagged Access Campaign

Fortunately MSF is here because the hospital was completely trashed and looted during the entry of the rebels into Bossangoa. I was afraid I would not have medications to continue my treatment, because there was nothing. But today, I have medicine.
MSF OPEN LETTER TO TPP COUNTRIES
As negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement continue in Malaysia, MSF urges negotiating countries to reject provisions that threaten to restrict access to affordable medicines. Read our open letter to the ‪#‎TPP‬ countries: http://ow.ly/n16Tb

MSF OPEN LETTER TO TPP COUNTRIES

As negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement continue in Malaysia, MSF urges negotiating countries to reject provisions that threaten to restrict access to affordable medicines. Read our open letter to the ‪#‎TPP‬ countries: http://ow.ly/n16Tb

MSF at TEDMED
"If it’s not introduced, and it’s not accessible to people, then it’s not innovation. Medical innovation is a new tool or method that is made accessible that leads to a public health impact." Our ExecutiveDirector, Dr. Manica Balasegaram, presents a new definition of medical innovation at TedMed in Athens.

MSF at TEDMED

"If it’s not introduced, and it’s not accessible to people, then it’s not innovation. Medical innovation is a new tool or method that is made accessible that leads to a public health impact." Our Executive
Director, Dr. Manica Balasegaram, presents a new definition of medical innovation at TedMed in Athens.

HIV TREATMENT COSTS
The price of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs may have dropped around 99% over the past decade, but access to treatment remains an issue. Patents on new ARV drugs cause prices to skyrocket, making them unaffordable for people in low and middle-income countries. 
Learn more in MSF Access Campaign’s 16th edition of Untangling the Web

HIV TREATMENT COSTS

The price of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs may have dropped around 99% over the past decade, but access to treatment remains an issue. Patents on new ARV drugs cause prices to skyrocket, making them unaffordable for people in low and middle-income countries. 

Learn more in MSF Access Campaign’s 16th edition of Untangling the Web

Photo: MSF team negotiating with community leaders to start mobile clinics.  Afghanistan 2013. © Heru Sutanto Koerniawan.
MSF sets up its first mobile clinic in Afghanistan to increase the coverage of vaccinations and improve preventative healthcare. Read more on how the team set up and spread awareness about the clinic in Lara’s blog post.

Photo: MSF team negotiating with community leaders to start mobile clinics.  Afghanistan 2013. © Heru Sutanto Koerniawan.

MSF sets up its first mobile clinic in Afghanistan to increase the coverage of vaccinations and improve preventative healthcare. Read more on how the team set up and spread awareness about the clinic in Lara’s blog post.

SLEEPING SICKNESS IN DRC
Sleeping sickness is a slow killer. National borders are not recognized by the tsetse fly; the parasite criss-crosses the forest and will happily migrate with either flies or humans and continue to infect new people and new areas.MSF has significantly reduced the number of sleeping sickness cases in the Democratic Republic of Congo through a mobile screening and treatment unit. Barrie Rooney, a laboratory scientist in DRC, talks about our work and the bold challenge MSF has taken on of eliminating the threat from this parasite: Read more.

SLEEPING SICKNESS IN DRC

Sleeping sickness is a slow killer. National borders are not recognized by the tsetse fly; the parasite criss-crosses the forest and will happily migrate with either flies or humans and continue to infect new people and new areas.

MSF has significantly reduced the number of sleeping sickness cases in the Democratic Republic of Congo through a mobile screening and treatment unit. Barrie Rooney, a laboratory scientist in DRC, talks about our work and the bold challenge MSF has taken on of eliminating the threat from this parasite: Read more.

For the first time, children in Tajikistan with multi drug-resistant tuberculosis are receiving treatment for the life threatening disease. Learn more about MSF’s Access to Essential Medicines Campaign.

For the first time, children in Tajikistan with multi drug-resistant tuberculosis are receiving treatment for the life threatening disease. Learn more about MSF’s Access to Essential Medicines Campaign.

The Need For Urgent HIV and TB Treatment in Myanmar. 


Tens of thousands of people living with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in Myanmar are unable to access lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a dire situation exacerbated by the recent cancellation of a new round of funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria.

“Lives in the Balance,” a report from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), outlines the situation for people affected by HIV and tuberculosis (TB), with a special focus on multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), in Myanmar today. It calls for urgent funding and assistance to be made available by the international donor community to help Myanmar close the devastating gap between people’s need and people’s access to treatment for HIV and TB.
Infographic by Will Owen

The Need For Urgent HIV and TB Treatment in Myanmar.

Tens of thousands of people living with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in Myanmar are unable to access lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a dire situation exacerbated by the recent cancellation of a new round of funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria.

Lives in the Balance,” a report from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), outlines the situation for people affected by HIV and tuberculosis (TB), with a special focus on multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), in Myanmar today. It calls for urgent funding and assistance to be made available by the international donor community to help Myanmar close the devastating gap between people’s need and people’s access to treatment for HIV and TB.

Infographic by Will Owen

Tuesday, MSF marched in the streets of DC with other organizations at the Internetional AIDS Conference. We told pharma to put people before profits. Millions die without access to affordable generic meds, we marched and will continue to march for them.

Tuesday, MSF marched in the streets of DC with other organizations at the Internetional AIDS Conference. We told pharma to put people before profits. Millions die without access to affordable generic meds, we marched and will continue to march for them.

Novartis’s Day in Court Set for July 10, 2012

India’s Supreme Court will now begin hearing a challenge to the country’s patent law by the Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis on July 10, 2012.The Novartis Supreme Court case is the final act in a legal battle that stretches back six years and has significant ramifications for India’s future capacity to produce low-cost generic medicines for its people, and for patients across developing countries.


Given the possible implications for generic production and the availability of affordable medicines from India, MSF, along with other treatment providers, patient groups and affected communities, has appealed to Novartis to drop its case against the “pharmacy of the developing world”.


MSF launched a social media campaign calling for Novartis to stop its legal attacks against India which threaten access to medicines for its patients. To participate in the Stop Novartis campaign, visit www.msfaccess.org/STOPnovartis WE NEED YOUR HELP!SIGN THIS PETITION TODAY!

Novartis’s Day in Court Set for July 10, 2012 India’s Supreme Court will now begin hearing a challenge to the country’s patent law by the Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis on July 10, 2012.

The Novartis Supreme Court case is the final act in a legal battle that stretches back six years and has significant ramifications for India’s future capacity to produce low-cost generic medicines for its people, and for patients across developing countries.

Given the possible implications for generic production and the availability of affordable medicines from India, MSF, along with other treatment providers, patient groups and affected communities, has appealed to Novartis to drop its case against the “pharmacy of the developing world”.

MSF launched a social media campaign calling for Novartis to stop its legal attacks against India which threaten access to medicines for its patients. To participate in the Stop Novartis campaign, visit www.msfaccess.org/STOPnovartis

WE NEED YOUR HELP!
SIGN THIS PETITION TODAY!

Access to Medicines: India Offers First Compulsory License
Groundbreaking Move Sets Precedent for Overcoming Drug Price Barriers

In a landmark case, the Indian Patent Office has issued the first-ever compulsory license in India to a generic drug manufacturer. This effectively ends German pharmaceutical company Bayer’s monopoly in India on the drug sorafenib tosylate, used to treat kidney and liver cancer.

The Patent Office acted on the basis that Bayer had not only failed to price the drug at an accessible and affordable level, but that it had also failed to ensure that the medicine was available in sufficient and sustainable quantities within India.

“We have been following this case closely because newer drugs to treat HIV are patented in India, and as a result are priced out of reach,” said Dr. Tido von Schoen-Angerer, director of the Doctors Without Borders Access Campaign. “But this decision marks a precedent that offers hope: it shows that new drugs under patent can also be produced by generic makers at a fraction of the price, while royalties are paid to the patent holder. This compensates patent holders while at the same time ensuring that competition can bring down prices.”

Competition from the generic version will bring the price of the drug in India down dramatically, from over US$5,500 per month to close to US$175 per month — a price reduction of nearly 97 per cent.

Access to Medicines: India Offers First Compulsory License

Groundbreaking Move Sets Precedent for Overcoming Drug Price Barriers

In a landmark case, the Indian Patent Office has issued the first-ever compulsory license in India to a generic drug manufacturer. This effectively ends German pharmaceutical company Bayer’s monopoly in India on the drug sorafenib tosylate, used to treat kidney and liver cancer.

The Patent Office acted on the basis that Bayer had not only failed to price the drug at an accessible and affordable level, but that it had also failed to ensure that the medicine was available in sufficient and sustainable quantities within India.

“We have been following this case closely because newer drugs to treat HIV are patented in India, and as a result are priced out of reach,” said Dr. Tido von Schoen-Angerer, director of the Doctors Without Borders Access Campaign. “But this decision marks a precedent that offers hope: it shows that new drugs under patent can also be produced by generic makers at a fraction of the price, while royalties are paid to the patent holder. This compensates patent holders while at the same time ensuring that competition can bring down prices.”

Competition from the generic version will bring the price of the drug in India down dramatically, from over US$5,500 per month to close to US$175 per month — a price reduction of nearly 97 per cent.

What’s at stake with the legal case from the pharmaceutical company Novartis in India? Find out in less than 30 seconds with the video above!

For the past 6 years drug giant Novartis has been pursuing a legal case in India that threatens access to life-saving affordable medicines for millions across the developing world.

As the case now opens before the Indian Supreme Court, join MSF & tell Novartis that people matter more than profits.

Join in on the action and tweet this line:

Help #MSF protect access to affordable meds, tell @Novartis to drop its case vs #India http://ow.ly/8XPoQ #STOPnovartis

For more information about the case and what actions you can take go here.

A majority of the drugs used by the American government’s PEPFAR HIV treatment program in Africa are from India. Anything that stifles the Indian ability to produce affordable HIV drugs will also affect the American program to create an AIDS-free generation. They will have to rely on expensive patented drugs, which means treating fewer patients.

Leena Menghaney, representative of Doctors Without Borders in India, quoted in The Washington Post’s coverage of the ambitious free-trade agreement being negotiated between India and the European Union that could severely curtail India’s production and export of affordable drugs for millions living with HIV in developing countries.

For more coverage on the negotiations in India click here.

Demonstrators in Delhi, India, protest against proposed provisions for a free-trade agreement between India and the EU that would limit access to lifesaving generic medicines in the developing world.

MSF spoke out for neglected patients in 2011 by waging campaigns for better practices around childhood malnutrition, for greater access to medicines for those who need them most, for the medical needs that exist in ever-expanding slums, and more.

Photo: India © Rico Gustva/APN+

Demonstrators in Delhi, India, protest against proposed provisions for a free-trade agreement between India and the EU that would limit access to lifesaving generic medicines in the developing world.

MSF spoke out for neglected patients in 2011 by waging campaigns for better practices around childhood malnutrition, for greater access to medicines for those who need them most, for the medical needs that exist in ever-expanding slums, and more.

Photo: India © Rico Gustva/APN+

Access to Essential Medicines: Ten Stories That Mattered in 2011

8. Stuck in The Middle: Drug Companies Push Up Prices for Patients in Middle-Income Countries

People living with HIV in middle-income countries like India, Brazil or Thailand are facing huge hikes in the costs of AIDS medicines—at a time when the pharmaceutical industry sees these countries as potentially lucrative markets for high-priced drugs, and “blockbuster” drugs go off-patent in wealthy countries.  

This year, a number of drug companies confirmed an ongoing trend by refusing to extend standardized price discounts to middle-income countries—something which was previously routine practice. ViiV, Merck, Johnson & Johnson, and Abbott all now specifically exclude middle-income countries from standardized price discounts for some or all of their drugs. Countries are thus forced to negotiate on a case-by-case basis, which is likely to lead to higher prices.

This move ignores the fact that the majority of people in middle-income countries can’t afford to pay high prices for medicines. To add to the problem, these countries are now losing the support from global health mechanisms like the Global Fund.

Photo: India 2009 © Sami Siva

Access to Essential Medicines: Ten Stories That Mattered in 2011

8. Stuck in The Middle: Drug Companies Push Up Prices for Patients in Middle-Income Countries

People living with HIV in middle-income countries like India, Brazil or Thailand are facing huge hikes in the costs of AIDS medicines—at a time when the pharmaceutical industry sees these countries as potentially lucrative markets for high-priced drugs, and “blockbuster” drugs go off-patent in wealthy countries.

This year, a number of drug companies confirmed an ongoing trend by refusing to extend standardized price discounts to middle-income countries—something which was previously routine practice. ViiV, Merck, Johnson & Johnson, and Abbott all now specifically exclude middle-income countries from standardized price discounts for some or all of their drugs. Countries are thus forced to negotiate on a case-by-case basis, which is likely to lead to higher prices.

This move ignores the fact that the majority of people in middle-income countries can’t afford to pay high prices for medicines. To add to the problem, these countries are now losing the support from global health mechanisms like the Global Fund.

Photo: India 2009 © Sami Siva