MSF Blogs: Triage Among Thousands of New Refugees

We were trying to triage everyone as they were coming off the truck, identifying the sickest and taking them to our clinical staff at the newly erected MSF clinic at T3. This is our name for the transit point at the junction of the main Jamam-Doro road and the road to KM18. After all the rain and storms of recent days, our contingency plan has kicked in. UNICEF and ACTED are now prioritizing moving all the refugees out of KM18. Each time it rains, the KM18 road becomes impassable and they have to wait for the road to dry.

So MSF has constructed a clinic, pharmacy, and observation tent in a few hours. We are ready with a NFI (non-food item) distribution so that each family can set up new temporary shelter. OXFAM have already constructed latrines and water points. Each time a truck arrives we naturally form a semi-circle around it, the medics at the front and the logisticians at the rear. I’m at the wing, also watching the refugees climbing over the side of the truck.Ruby Siddiqui is an epidemiologist based in the Manson Unit, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)’s clinical research unit in London, United Kingdom. She is currently working on the refugee crisis in South Sudan. You can read her MSF Field Blog here.

Photo: Between 30,000 and 35,000 new refugees crossed the border from Sudan’s Blue Nile State into South Sudan’s Upper Nile State over a period of three weeks at the end of May and the beginning of June.
South Sudan 2012 © Louise Roland-Gosselin/MSF

MSF Blogs: Triage Among Thousands of New Refugees

We were trying to triage everyone as they were coming off the truck, identifying the sickest and taking them to our clinical staff at the newly erected MSF clinic at T3. This is our name for the transit point at the junction of the main Jamam-Doro road and the road to KM18. After all the rain and storms of recent days, our contingency plan has kicked in. UNICEF and ACTED are now prioritizing moving all the refugees out of KM18. Each time it rains, the KM18 road becomes impassable and they have to wait for the road to dry.

So MSF has constructed a clinic, pharmacy, and observation tent in a few hours. We are ready with a NFI (non-food item) distribution so that each family can set up new temporary shelter. OXFAM have already constructed latrines and water points. Each time a truck arrives we naturally form a semi-circle around it, the medics at the front and the logisticians at the rear. I’m at the wing, also watching the refugees climbing over the side of the truck.

Ruby Siddiqui is an epidemiologist based in the Manson Unit, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)’s clinical research unit in London, United Kingdom. She is currently working on the refugee crisis in South Sudan. You can read her MSF Field Blog here.

Photo: Between 30,000 and 35,000 new refugees crossed the border from Sudan’s Blue Nile State into South Sudan’s Upper Nile State over a period of three weeks at the end of May and the beginning of June.
South Sudan 2012 © Louise Roland-Gosselin/MSF

34 notes

Show

  1. amnestyinternationalub reblogged this from doctorswithoutborders
  2. christaaayvolley reblogged this from doctorswithoutborders
  3. marshypillos reblogged this from doctorswithoutborders
  4. ohmysweetbabyjesus reblogged this from doctorswithoutborders
  5. baveshmoorthy reblogged this from doctorswithoutborders
  6. benjaminldaniel reblogged this from doctorswithoutborders
  7. sans-nuage reblogged this from doctorswithoutborders
  8. art7lover reblogged this from doctorswithoutborders
  9. samiloveshark reblogged this from doctorswithoutborders
  10. jardila reblogged this from doctorswithoutborders
  11. www-outerspacepi reblogged this from doctorswithoutborders
  12. theblacksnorlax reblogged this from doctorswithoutborders
  13. vegas2la reblogged this from doctorswithoutborders
  14. cest-la-sneha reblogged this from doctorswithoutborders
  15. doctorswithoutborders posted this