"I didn’t want to be another statistic of TB." Phumeza endured incredibly arduous treatment for her extensively drug-resistant TB. Now she is asking for better care for all TB patients. Sign the TB Manifesto:http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/Photo by Sydelle Willow Smith

"I didn’t want to be another statistic of TB." Phumeza endured incredibly arduous treatment for her extensively drug-resistant TB. Now she is asking for better care for all TB patients. Sign the TB Manifesto:http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/
Photo by Sydelle Willow Smith

With new, better drugs for his multidrug-resistant TB, Vardan is now able to be with his family instead of in and out of the hospital. “I am young. I am 60 years old. I am still useful to my community.” http://bit.ly/1if7CYg

Photo by Karl Nawezi/MSF
Taghry and Masaya, along with six children, were among the 15,000 people who fled the conflict in Mali in January 2013 and sought safety in neighboring Mauritania. They arrived with nothing other than the clothes on their backs and are now completely dependent on humanitarian aid….On arriving in Bassikounou, an ultrasound confirmed Taghry was pregnant with quadruplets. The MSF medical team made the quick decision to perform a caesarean section. Taghry gave birth to three small but healthy boys and one healthy girl. At first, they are simply called Baby 1, 2, 3 and 4. Saturday is International Women’s Day. On that day, and every day, thousands of women worldwide will leave their homes to flee war or persecution. The fact that they are women makes their ordeal even more harrowing. Read this and other stories: http://bit.ly/1fLR5fE

Photo by Karl Nawezi/MSF

Taghry and Masaya, along with six children, were among the 15,000 people who fled the conflict in Mali in January 2013 and sought safety in neighboring Mauritania. They arrived with nothing other than the clothes on their backs and are now completely dependent on humanitarian aid….On arriving in Bassikounou, an ultrasound confirmed Taghry was pregnant with quadruplets. The MSF medical team made the quick decision to perform a caesarean section. Taghry gave birth to three small but healthy boys and one healthy girl. At first, they are simply called Baby 1, 2, 3 and 4. Saturday is International Women’s Day. On that day, and every day, thousands of women worldwide will leave their homes to flee war or persecution. The fact that they are women makes their ordeal even more harrowing. Read this and other stories: http://bit.ly/1fLR5fE

Photo by Yann Libessart
From Margaret Barclay, MSF midwife: “In the Philippines, the (Typhoon Haiyan) disaster destroyed everything and people did not know whether health care was accessible or not. The first woman who delivered with us in Tacloban would have died if she had not received care. …She was very sick, had been displaced by the typhoon and was living in a tent. Her labor was obstructed and she had also developed pre-eclampsia, a hypertensive disorder, which is a severe complication of pregnancy.” Saturday is International Women’s Day. On that day, and every day, thousands of women worldwide will leave their homes to flee war or persecution. The fact that they are women makes their ordeal even more harrowing. Read this and other stories: http://bit.ly/1fLR5fE

Photo by Yann Libessart

From Margaret Barclay, MSF midwife: “In the Philippines, the (Typhoon Haiyan) disaster destroyed everything and people did not know whether health care was accessible or not. The first woman who delivered with us in Tacloban would have died if she had not received care. …She was very sick, had been displaced by the typhoon and was living in a tent. Her labor was obstructed and she had also developed pre-eclampsia, a hypertensive disorder, which is a severe complication of pregnancy.” Saturday is International Women’s Day. On that day, and every day, thousands of women worldwide will leave their homes to flee war or persecution. The fact that they are women makes their ordeal even more harrowing. Read this and other stories: http://bit.ly/1fLR5fE

Photo by Jean Pierre Amigo
From Rhoda, 24 years old, in South Sudan: “I was going to the health clinic in Bor town during my pregnancy. When we had to flee the area, I ran for my life, but being eight months pregnant, it was not easy. This was the toughest time of my life. My husband was stuck in Juba and I was in the bush convinced I was going to lose our child. One night, my mother and I got into one big boat with 100 others crossing to Awerial county. …The journey was awful, lying in dirty water mixed with animal feces. When we arrived to Minkaman, my mother found a small area with a few trees, big enough for the two of us to settle. Soon I started having some persistent pains and my mum helped me deliver a baby boy.” Saturday is International Women’s Day. On that day, and every day, thousands of women worldwide will leave their homes to flee war or persecution. The fact that they are women makes their ordeal even more harrowing. Read this and other stories: http://bit.ly/1fLR5fE

Photo by Jean Pierre Amigo

From Rhoda, 24 years old, in South Sudan: “I was going to the health clinic in Bor town during my pregnancy. When we had to flee the area, I ran for my life, but being eight months pregnant, it was not easy. This was the toughest time of my life. My husband was stuck in Juba and I was in the bush convinced I was going to lose our child. One night, my mother and I got into one big boat with 100 others crossing to Awerial county. …The journey was awful, lying in dirty water mixed with animal feces. When we arrived to Minkaman, my mother found a small area with a few trees, big enough for the two of us to settle. Soon I started having some persistent pains and my mum helped me deliver a baby boy.” Saturday is International Women’s Day. On that day, and every day, thousands of women worldwide will leave their homes to flee war or persecution. The fact that they are women makes their ordeal even more harrowing. Read this and other stories: http://bit.ly/1fLR5fE

Photo by Yann Libessart
From Mildrène, 14 years old, in Haiti: “My family lived in Solino before the earthquake, not well, but we had a roof and could sleep without fear. On January 12, 2010, our house was destroyed. … After that night we lived in a displaced camp called Accra. One day I went out to buy food for my dad. On my way a man asked where I was going and gave me money to buy him a meal too. When I came back with his plate, he took my hand and told me he would kill my parents if I did not do whatever he asks. I knew one of his friends had already killed a man in the camp and I was very scared. Then he raped me.” Saturday is International Women’s Day. On that day, and every day, thousands of women worldwide will leave their homes to flee war or persecution. The fact that they are women makes their ordeal even more harrowing. Read this and other stories: http://bit.ly/1fLR5fE

Photo by Yann Libessart

From Mildrène, 14 years old, in Haiti: “My family lived in Solino before the earthquake, not well, but we had a roof and could sleep without fear. On January 12, 2010, our house was destroyed. … After that night we lived in a displaced camp called Accra. One day I went out to buy food for my dad. On my way a man asked where I was going and gave me money to buy him a meal too. When I came back with his plate, he took my hand and told me he would kill my parents if I did not do whatever he asks. I knew one of his friends had already killed a man in the camp and I was very scared. Then he raped me.” Saturday is International Women’s Day. On that day, and every day, thousands of women worldwide will leave their homes to flee war or persecution. The fact that they are women makes their ordeal even more harrowing. Read this and other stories: http://bit.ly/1fLR5fE

Photo by Eymeric Laurent-Gascoin
From Sarah Dina, MSF mental health officer in Pakistan: “Imagine that on your month-long trek across the mountains to safety, you have little food and water. You have blisters on your feet from your shoes at the start; you have cuts on your feet from walking barefoot at the end. Imagine walking through the snow, up a steep incline, hiding in the shrubbery when you hear a blast.  Just imagine that as you walk, you see small children along the way who have been abandoned by their parents because it was impossible to carry them any longer through such rough terrain and in such harsh conditions. I tried to imagine how these parents felt. But I stopped myself. It’s too painful to think about their pain.” Saturday is International Women’s Day. On that day, and every day, thousands of women worldwide will leave their homes to flee war or persecution. The fact that they are women makes their ordeal even more harrowing. Read this and other stories: http://bit.ly/1fLR5fE

Photo by Eymeric Laurent-Gascoin

From Sarah Dina, MSF mental health officer in Pakistan: “Imagine that on your month-long trek across the mountains to safety, you have little food and water. You have blisters on your feet from your shoes at the start; you have cuts on your feet from walking barefoot at the end. Imagine walking through the snow, up a steep incline, hiding in the shrubbery when you hear a blast.  Just imagine that as you walk, you see small children along the way who have been abandoned by their parents because it was impossible to carry them any longer through such rough terrain and in such harsh conditions. I tried to imagine how these parents felt. But I stopped myself. It’s too painful to think about their pain.” Saturday is International Women’s Day. On that day, and every day, thousands of women worldwide will leave their homes to flee war or persecution. The fact that they are women makes their ordeal even more harrowing. Read this and other stories: http://bit.ly/1fLR5fE

Some 2.96 million people are currently displaced in DR Congo  and many of them have no access to humanitarian assistance. Many communities are cut off from medical care due to poor infrastructure, displacement and conflict, and adequate assistance is not being provided in rural and conflict-affected areas by aid organizations and by the state. At the same time, violence against civilians, medical staff and property is commonplace, and health care providers are regularly required to suspend operations, leaving people deprived of the medical care they urgently need. Read MSF’s report, “Everyday Emergency: Silent Suffering in Democratic Republic of Congo”: http://bit.ly/1mT34fk

Some 2.96 million people are currently displaced in DR Congo  and many of them have no access to humanitarian assistance. Many communities are cut off from medical care due to poor infrastructure, displacement and conflict, and adequate assistance is not being provided in rural and conflict-affected areas by aid organizations and by the state. At the same time, violence against civilians, medical staff and property is commonplace, and health care providers are regularly required to suspend operations, leaving people deprived of the medical care they urgently need. Read MSF’s report, “Everyday Emergency: Silent Suffering in Democratic Republic of Congo”: http://bit.ly/1mT34fk

"I was shot, even though I wasn’t fighting anyone or committing any crime." - Munyasadimana, a displaced man in Mgunga camp, DRC. Hear the stories of some of the 2.96 million people currently displaced in that country. After 20 years of fighting, a lack of medical assistance and other needs, many displaced Congolese experience "Everyday violence".




 

Photo © Mikhail Galustov
Sardar (sitting), 34, is from Nahri Saraj district of Helmand province. After a car accident, he received poor treatment at a local health facility during which a doctor removed synovial liquid from his knee. It has left him unable to walk and in need of complex, costly surgery available only in Kabul. Even if he can borrow the money to pay for the procedure, there is no guarantee that it will work. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo © Mikhail Galustov

Sardar (sitting), 34, is from Nahri Saraj district of Helmand province. After a car accident, he received poor treatment at a local health facility during which a doctor removed synovial liquid from his knee. It has left him unable to walk and in need of complex, costly surgery available only in Kabul. Even if he can borrow the money to pay for the procedure, there is no guarantee that it will work. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo © Mikhail Galustov

Najibullah (left) waits for a check-up at MSF’s Kunduz Trauma Centre in northern Afghanistan. The father of 11 was shot in the leg when a firefight broke out near the construction site he was working on. The police closed off the surrounding roads and his relatives couldn’t take him to the hospital until the fighting stopped the next morning. When he finally reached a doctor, he had lost a great deal of blood and was in a critical condition. He is one of many Afghans who cannot access emergency medical care because security problems make it to dangerous to travel at night. Injuries like Najibullah’s get much worse; his leg had to be amputated. Women enduring complicated labor suffer excessively, and sometimes die. Families can only keep “death watches” over relatives overnight, hoping they survive until morning, when it might be safer to try to reach a doctor. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo © Mikhail Galustov

Najibullah (left) waits for a check-up at MSF’s Kunduz Trauma Centre in northern Afghanistan. The father of 11 was shot in the leg when a firefight broke out near the construction site he was working on. The police closed off the surrounding roads and his relatives couldn’t take him to the hospital until the fighting stopped the next morning. When he finally reached a doctor, he had lost a great deal of blood and was in a critical condition. He is one of many Afghans who cannot access emergency medical care because security problems make it to dangerous to travel at night. Injuries like Najibullah’s get much worse; his leg had to be amputated. Women enduring complicated labor suffer excessively, and sometimes die. Families can only keep “death watches” over relatives overnight, hoping they survive until morning, when it might be safer to try to reach a doctor. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo by © Andrea Bruce/Noor Images

A woman sits with her week-old child, who was born in this very same mud home where they live in a camp for displaced people on Kabul’s outskirts. The mother says she has been bleeding continually since the birth and still cannot stand. Without skilled medical help, women who deliver at home are at greater risk of illness or death if they face complications. Since the early 2000s, the population of Kabul has grown from three to five million people, with a constant flow of people arriving seeking safety or economic opportunity. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo by © Andrea Bruce/Noor Images

A woman sits with her week-old child, who was born in this very same mud home where they live in a camp for displaced people on Kabul’s outskirts. The mother says she has been bleeding continually since the birth and still cannot stand. Without skilled medical help, women who deliver at home are at greater risk of illness or death if they face complications. Since the early 2000s, the population of Kabul has grown from three to five million people, with a constant flow of people arriving seeking safety or economic opportunity. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo © Andrea Bruce/Noor Images

Chamangul’s mother uses her headscarf to fan away flies as her son Chamangul, 12, lies on a bed at the MSF-supported Ahmad Shah Baba hospital in eastern Kabul. He has the body of a boy half his age, but his head is swollen, wrapped in bandages. His mother brought him to MSF’s mobile clinic in Puli Charki, on Kabul’s outskirts, after being turned away from hospitals in the city. The MSF doctors say he suffers from an aggressive form of sarcoma that went untreated for too long and which has rotted most of his head, an ear and an eye. The doctors say they might have been able to help had they seen him earlier, but all they can do now is ease his pain. His mother is a widow who already lost two children to the same illness and now lives with her seven surviving children in a tent surrounded by other families displaced by violence in their home districts.

Photo © Andrea Bruce/Noor Images

Chamangul’s mother uses her headscarf to fan away flies as her son Chamangul, 12, lies on a bed at the MSF-supported Ahmad Shah Baba hospital in eastern Kabul. He has the body of a boy half his age, but his head is swollen, wrapped in bandages. His mother brought him to MSF’s mobile clinic in Puli Charki, on Kabul’s outskirts, after being turned away from hospitals in the city. The MSF doctors say he suffers from an aggressive form of sarcoma that went untreated for too long and which has rotted most of his head, an ear and an eye. The doctors say they might have been able to help had they seen him earlier, but all they can do now is ease his pain. His mother is a widow who already lost two children to the same illness and now lives with her seven surviving children in a tent surrounded by other families displaced by violence in their home districts.

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF
An MSF medical worker measures a displaced child for malnutrition. Muslim communities in many towns in western Central African Republic (CAR) have been attacked in recent weeks and residents have fled. In the town of Carnot, on several occasions, armed men entered the grounds of the city hospital where MSF is working, either in an attempt to kill patients or to attack displaced people living there. The hospital teams had to intervene each time. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF

An MSF medical worker measures a displaced child for malnutrition. Muslim communities in many towns in western Central African Republic (CAR) have been attacked in recent weeks and residents have fled. In the town of Carnot, on several occasions, armed men entered the grounds of the city hospital where MSF is working, either in an attempt to kill patients or to attack displaced people living there. The hospital teams had to intervene each time. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF
Anyone who hides Muslims from the anti-balaka militia is at risk in Carnot, Central African Republic (CAR). On February 7, an anti-Balaka group entered a house where 86 displaced Muslim men, women, and children were being hidden. Seven men were executed and three people were struck with a machete, including a 12-year-old child. After nearly two hours of very tense negotiations, MSF was able to gather the wounded and those requiring immediate medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF

Anyone who hides Muslims from the anti-balaka militia is at risk in Carnot, Central African Republic (CAR). On February 7, an anti-Balaka group entered a house where 86 displaced Muslim men, women, and children were being hidden. Seven men were executed and three people were struck with a machete, including a 12-year-old child. After nearly two hours of very tense negotiations, MSF was able to gather the wounded and those requiring immediate medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W