Doctors Without Borders

Jul 04

Photo by Mario Travaini
“I was the only midwife on the day Sedra’s mother came to MSF’s hospital in Syria,” says Amanda Godballe, a Danish midwife for MSF. “She was only six months pregnant, but the delivery had already begun. She was expecting her first children – two twin girls. There was no way to stop the delivery as it was already too far along. In our hospital we had very limited possibilities of taking care of premature babies. We had no pediatricians, incubators, or medicine to treat babies this premature. And as I was the only midwife at the hospital that day I had to do some creative thinking, especially because I knew that the children were likely to need resuscitation to stabilize them enough to be transferred to a more fully equipped hospital over the border, where treatment was possible.”
“I got my Belgian co-worker and nurse to help me in the delivery room, although she had never assisted with a delivery before. But inexperienced hands are better than no hands! At the same time I had my good Syrian colleague to help me and also an interpreter.” 
“Both children were quickly born. First Sedra – bottom first – and then her sister – also with her bottom first. They each weighed about 1,200 grams. Sedra was reasonably well stabilized with the help of an oxygen mask and an electric radiator to keep her warm. Unfortunately, her sister did not do as well. She died only 30 minutes old. Sedra was transferred to the border, in one of MSF’s ambulances, along with her mother. And there I was, in the backseat of an ambulance with a teeny tiny vulnerable human being, who had so many odds stacked against her. At the border we had to wait, and when the medics finally came I had to hand them the small bundle across the barbed wire fence, drive back to our makeshift hospital, and hope for the best.”

Photo by Mario Travaini

“I was the only midwife on the day Sedra’s mother came to MSF’s hospital in Syria,” says Amanda Godballe, a Danish midwife for MSF. “She was only six months pregnant, but the delivery had already begun. She was expecting her first children – two twin girls. There was no way to stop the delivery as it was already too far along. In our hospital we had very limited possibilities of taking care of premature babies. We had no pediatricians, incubators, or medicine to treat babies this premature. And as I was the only midwife at the hospital that day I had to do some creative thinking, especially because I knew that the children were likely to need resuscitation to stabilize them enough to be transferred to a more fully equipped hospital over the border, where treatment was possible.”

“I got my Belgian co-worker and nurse to help me in the delivery room, although she had never assisted with a delivery before. But inexperienced hands are better than no hands! At the same time I had my good Syrian colleague to help me and also an interpreter.” 

“Both children were quickly born. First Sedra – bottom first – and then her sister – also with her bottom first. They each weighed about 1,200 grams. Sedra was reasonably well stabilized with the help of an oxygen mask and an electric radiator to keep her warm. Unfortunately, her sister did not do as well. She died only 30 minutes old. Sedra was transferred to the border, in one of MSF’s ambulances, along with her mother. And there I was, in the backseat of an ambulance with a teeny tiny vulnerable human being, who had so many odds stacked against her. At the border we had to wait, and when the medics finally came I had to hand them the small bundle across the barbed wire fence, drive back to our makeshift hospital, and hope for the best.”

Jul 01

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos.
Sia Bintou spent more than 10 days in MSF’s Ebola treatment center in Guéckédou, Guinea. There were many times when the medical team thought she would not make it, but Bintou beat the disease. Here, staff congratulate her as she is discharged. Right now, Ebola patients have been identified in more than 60 locations in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. MSF is the only aid organization treating people affected by the virus.

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos.

Sia Bintou spent more than 10 days in MSF’s Ebola treatment center in Guéckédou, Guinea. There were many times when the medical team thought she would not make it, but Bintou beat the disease. Here, staff congratulate her as she is discharged. Right now, Ebola patients have been identified in more than 60 locations in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. MSF is the only aid organization treating people affected by the virus.

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos.
Teams at the treatment center at Donka hospital, in Conakry, Guinea, work through the night and 24/7. Since the outbreak in West Africa began in March, MSF has treated 470 patients—215 of them confirmed cases—in specialized treatment centers in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. The scale of this Ebola epidemic is unprecedented in terms of geographical distribution and the numbers of cases and deaths. There have been 528 cases and 337 deaths since the epidemic began, according to the latest World Health Organization (WHO) figures.

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos.

Teams at the treatment center at Donka hospital, in Conakry, Guinea, work through the night and 24/7. Since the outbreak in West Africa began in March, MSF has treated 470 patients—215 of them confirmed cases—in specialized treatment centers in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. The scale of this Ebola epidemic is unprecedented in terms of geographical distribution and the numbers of cases and deaths. There have been 528 cases and 337 deaths since the epidemic began, according to the latest World Health Organization (WHO) figures.

Jun 27

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
The MSF-supported Mamadou M’Baïki health center serves a diverse neighborhood that has nonetheless seen the exodus of many Muslim inhabitants, who have fled violence. Between January, a month after MSF first began to provide support to the Mamadou M’Baïki center, and May 2014, the percentage of Muslim patients served has gone from 30% to less than 10%. "We have no other choice than to flee," said a displaced person waiting in a transit camp near Bangui airport in February.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

The MSF-supported Mamadou M’Baïki health center serves a diverse neighborhood that has nonetheless seen the exodus of many Muslim inhabitants, who have fled violence. Between January, a month after MSF first began to provide support to the Mamadou M’Baïki center, and May 2014, the percentage of Muslim patients served has gone from 30% to less than 10%. "We have no other choice than to flee," said a displaced person waiting in a transit camp near Bangui airport in February.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
Here, a mother and child wait for non-food item distribution at an MSF mobile clinic in the Central African Republic (CAR). Since the beginning of February, MSF sends a mobile clinic several times a week to the Central Mosque of Bangui, the capital of the CAR, in the district of PK5. There, thousands of displaced people are gathered, afraid to go to the local Mamadou M’Baïki health center, which is supported by MSF. In the month of May alone, 583 consultations were provided provided, and patients include 93 children.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

Here, a mother and child wait for non-food item distribution at an MSF mobile clinic in the Central African Republic (CAR). Since the beginning of February, MSF sends a mobile clinic several times a week to the Central Mosque of Bangui, the capital of the CAR, in the district of PK5. There, thousands of displaced people are gathered, afraid to go to the local Mamadou M’Baïki health center, which is supported by MSF. In the month of May alone, 583 consultations were provided provided, and patients include 93 children.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
 A young boy, displaced by conflict in the Central African Republic (CAR), peers through the curtains of a temporary shelter at the Mamadou M’Baïki health center in the PK5 Muslim neighborhood of Bangui, which MSF has been supporting since December. In May, MSF referred 19 malnourished children to an existing Action Against Hunger (ACF) project in Bangui. While the Ministry of Health will take over medical care for adults on July 1st, 2014, MSF will continue to provide free pediatric care to children 0-15 years old, and free medication to patients of all ages.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

 A young boy, displaced by conflict in the Central African Republic (CAR), peers through the curtains of a temporary shelter at the Mamadou M’Baïki health center in the PK5 Muslim neighborhood of Bangui, which MSF has been supporting since December. In May, MSF referred 19 malnourished children to an existing Action Against Hunger (ACF) project in Bangui. While the Ministry of Health will take over medical care for adults on July 1st, 2014, MSF will continue to provide free pediatric care to children 0-15 years old, and free medication to patients of all ages.

Jun 24

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
A mother and child wait for the results of a blood test for malaria in the PK5 district of Bangui. The time from testing to results is 15 minutes, and provides a positive or negative result by searching for parasites in the blood. Malaria is transmitted when one is bitten by an infected Anopheles mosquito carrying the parasite. In 2012, malaria caused an estimated 627,000 deaths, mostly among African children, but is both preventable and curable when caught in time. Control and preventative measures can dramatically reduce the incidence of this disease.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

A mother and child wait for the results of a blood test for malaria in the PK5 district of Bangui. The time from testing to results is 15 minutes, and provides a positive or negative result by searching for parasites in the blood. Malaria is transmitted when one is bitten by an infected Anopheles mosquito carrying the parasite. In 2012, malaria caused an estimated 627,000 deaths, mostly among African children, but is both preventable and curable when caught in time. Control and preventative measures can dramatically reduce the incidence of this disease.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
"Malaria kills more than bullets," said an MSF nurse in the PK5 district of Bangui in February. Here, boxes of malaria antigen detection tests, which allow for rapid diagnosis in the absence of a traditional laboratory, are shown sorted by negative or positive results. In May, 687 consultations were conducted for malaria patients. Malaria remains one of the primary public health problems in the Central African Republic and the leading cause of death among children.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

"Malaria kills more than bullets," said an MSF nurse in the PK5 district of Bangui in February. Here, boxes of malaria antigen detection tests, which allow for rapid diagnosis in the absence of a traditional laboratory, are shown sorted by negative or positive results. In May, 687 consultations were conducted for malaria patients. Malaria remains one of the primary public health problems in the Central African Republic and the leading cause of death among children.

Photo by Diana Zeynab Alhindawi
A patient rests at Nap Kenbe surgical center in Tabarre, eastern Port-au-Prince. Teams provide emergency trauma, orthopedic and abdominal surgery for victims of gun crime and domestic violence as well as people injured in road accidents.
MSF has worked in Haiti for nearly two and a half decades. In Port-au-Prince teams are running trauma surgery and burn treatment services in Drouillard neighborhood, surgical and orthopedic care in Nap Kembe hospital in Tabarre, a stabilization center in Martissant neighborhood, and an emergency obstetrics program in Delmas 33. All MSF services in Haiti are open 24 hours a day and are free of charge.

Photo by Diana Zeynab Alhindawi


A patient rests at Nap Kenbe surgical center in Tabarre, eastern Port-au-Prince. Teams provide emergency trauma, orthopedic and abdominal surgery for victims of gun crime and domestic violence as well as people injured in road accidents.

MSF has worked in Haiti for nearly two and a half decades. In Port-au-Prince teams are running trauma surgery and burn treatment services in Drouillard neighborhood, surgical and orthopedic care in Nap Kembe hospital in Tabarre, a stabilization center in Martissant neighborhood, and an emergency obstetrics program in Delmas 33. All MSF services in Haiti are open 24 hours a day and are free of charge.

Photo by Diana Zeynab Alhindawi 
A nurse cradles a newborn at the obstetric and neonatal emergency hospital in Delmas 33 neighborhood of Port-au-Prince. The hospital offers free, around-the-clock emergency care for women with complications during pregnancy or child birth.
MSF has worked in Haiti for nearly two and a half decades. In Port-au-Prince teams are running trauma surgery and burn treatment services in Drouillard neighborhood, surgical and orthopedic care in Nap Kembe hospital in Tabarre, a stabilization center in Martissant neighborhood, and an emergency obstetrics program in Delmas 33. All MSF services in Haiti are open 24 hours a day and are free of charge.

Photo by Diana Zeynab Alhindawi

A nurse cradles a newborn at the obstetric and neonatal emergency hospital in Delmas 33 neighborhood of Port-au-Prince. The hospital offers free, around-the-clock emergency care for women with complications during pregnancy or child birth.

MSF has worked in Haiti for nearly two and a half decades. In Port-au-Prince teams are running trauma surgery and burn treatment services in Drouillard neighborhood, surgical and orthopedic care in Nap Kembe hospital in Tabarre, a stabilization center in Martissant neighborhood, and an emergency obstetrics program in Delmas 33. All MSF services in Haiti are open 24 hours a day and are free of charge.

Jun 20

Photo by Nick Owen

Kiden Margaret, 31, is the mother of two-year-old John Mukaya. John started showing signs of cholera – an upset stomach, vomiting, crying, and not wanting to eat, so she brought him to the MSF cholera treatment center in Juba, South Sudan.  “ Cholera is now increasingly affecting many people and killing children especially. Myson was very weak, now we are here and he is put on drip and given oral rehydration solutions. I hope my son will get better. It is the first time my child is being affected and treated for cholera. My other three children are all fine. At home we eat normal food and drink usual water; I do not understand how my child got the cholera’’

Photo by Nick Owen
Kiden Margaret, 31, is the mother of two-year-old John Mukaya. John started showing signs of cholera – an upset stomach, vomiting, crying, and not wanting to eat, so she brought him to the MSF cholera treatment center in Juba, South Sudan.   Cholera is now increasingly affecting many people and killing children especially. Myson was very weak, now we are here and he is put on drip and given oral rehydration solutions. I hope my son will get better. It is the first time my child is being affected and treated for cholera. My other three children are all fine. At home we eat normal food and drink usual water; I do not understand how my child got the cholera’’

Photo by Karem Issa/MSF

For World Refugee Day - today - MSF is highlighting stories of Syrian refugees working with MSF to help other refugees in Iraq. Dr. Selim was working as a general surgeon in Syria when conflict started close by in rural Aleppo governorate. He found himself and his clinic in the middle of a battle over territory between multiple groups. “I was stuck for eight months, unable to leave my clinic for Aleppo or anywhere else.” He managed to escape and set up a field hospital outside of town, but as a Kurd he was targeted. When the threat of kidnapping became too great, he fled with his wife to a refugee camp in Iraq. There he eventually found MSF and began working as a physician, treating other Syrians who escaped the violence. “I know about their suffering and their way of thinking. Sometimes the only treatment they need is through words, not drugs.” Read his story: http://bit.ly/1jBh9av


 

Photo by Karem Issa/MSF

For World Refugee Day - today - MSF is highlighting stories of Syrian refugees working with MSF to help other refugees in Iraq. Dr. Selim was working as a general surgeon in Syria when conflict started close by in rural Aleppo governorate. He found himself and his clinic in the middle of a battle over territory between multiple groups. “I was stuck for eight months, unable to leave my clinic for Aleppo or anywhere else.” He managed to escape and set up a field hospital outside of town, but as a Kurd he was targeted. When the threat of kidnapping became too great, he fled with his wife to a refugee camp in Iraq. There he eventually found MSF and began working as a physician, treating other Syrians who escaped the violence. “I know about their suffering and their way of thinking. Sometimes the only treatment they need is through words, not drugs.” Read his story: http://bit.ly/1jBh9av

 

Jun 17

Photo by Nick Owen
Grandmother Unice Keji, 58, sits beside her two eldest grandchildren, Simon Jeden and Rizik Jeden, while the youngest, Alfred Idi, lies on a cot. All of Unice’s grandchildren are suspected cholera patients in Juba, South Sudan. “ All my grandchildren fell sick, I did not know about cholera sickness or symptoms. When I explained my children’s sickness to my nearest neighbor and she suggested that this could be a possible sign of cholera, she directed me to come to this Gudele 2 cholera treatment center. People should take care of themselves especially children from touching dirty materials; all should keep their homes’ clean and boil drinking water.” Simon and Rizik have responded quickly to the treatment, Alfred is still under observation. 

Photo by Nick Owen

Grandmother Unice Keji, 58, sits beside her two eldest grandchildren, Simon Jeden and Rizik Jeden, while the youngest, Alfred Idi, lies on a cot. All of Unice’s grandchildren are suspected cholera patients in Juba, South Sudan. “ All my grandchildren fell sick, I did not know about cholera sickness or symptoms. When I explained my children’s sickness to my nearest neighbor and she suggested that this could be a possible sign of cholera, she directed me to come to this Gudele 2 cholera treatment center. People should take care of themselves especially children from touching dirty materials; all should keep their homes’ clean and boil drinking water.” Simon and Rizik have responded quickly to the treatment, Alfred is still under observation. 

Photo by Nick Owen

Alice John, 17, is one of the patients being treated for cholera at the MSF Gudele 2 cholera treatment center (CTC) in Juba, South Sudan. “ I am happy that MSF is providing us with cholera treatment. When myfamily told me about this Gudele 2 center that no money had to be paid for treatment, I came straight away and now I am here being treated freely. I am happy the vomiting has reduced and diarrhea has stopped, I am getting well. I would like to say to everyone: you should keep good hygiene!” To date there have been 1,545 cases of cholera and 37 related deaths reported in Juba.

Photo by Nick Owen
Alice John, 17, is one of the patients being treated for cholera at the MSF Gudele 2 cholera treatment center (CTC) in Juba, South Sudan. “ I am happy that MSF is providing us with cholera treatment. When myfamily told me about this Gudele 2 center that no money had to be paid for treatment, I came straight away and now I am here being treated freely. I am happy the vomiting has reduced and diarrhea has stopped, I am getting well. I would like to say to everyone: you should keep good hygiene!” To date there have been 1,545 cases of cholera and 37 related deaths reported in Juba.

Jun 13

MSF was deeply saddened to learn of the tragic death of Dr. Richard Rockefeller, who was killed today in a plane crash. MSF extends its deepest sympathies and condolences to his family. Dr. Rockefeller was instrumental to the founding of MSF in the United States. He served as chair of the Board of Advisors of MSF-USA for 21 years, leveraging his credibility within the philanthropic community to garner the financial support that was so critical to ensuring MSF’s continued financial independence. While leading this advisory committee and visiting MSF programs abroad, including those in Cambodia, Malawi, Niger, Thailand, and Cambodia, Dr. Rockefeller also worked as a field doctor in Peru and in northern Nigeria while a massive meningitis outbreak struck the country in 2009. Read more: http://bit.ly/1scvvYb

MSF was deeply saddened to learn of the tragic death of Dr. Richard Rockefeller, who was killed today in a plane crash. MSF extends its deepest sympathies and condolences to his family. Dr. Rockefeller was instrumental to the founding of MSF in the United States. He served as chair of the Board of Advisors of MSF-USA for 21 years, leveraging his credibility within the philanthropic community to garner the financial support that was so critical to ensuring MSF’s continued financial independence. While leading this advisory committee and visiting MSF programs abroad, including those in Cambodia, Malawi, Niger, Thailand, and Cambodia, Dr. Rockefeller also worked as a field doctor in Peru and in northern Nigeria while a massive meningitis outbreak struck the country in 2009. Read more: http://bit.ly/1scvvYb