Doctors Without Borders

Aug 19

Malaria is most common in poor, deprived areas. In many cases, malaria itself is the cause of such poverty: malaria causes havoc on a socioeconomic level as patients are often bedridden and incapable of carrying out normal daily tasks, resulting in burdens on households and health services, and ultimately huge losses to income in malaria-endemic countries. This suffering and loss of life are tragically unnecessary because malaria is largely preventable, detectable, and treatable.

While 90 percent of malaria deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa, the disease is present in nearly every tropical area where  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) carries out field programs: from Ethiopia and Sierra Leone to Cambodia and Myanmar. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Malaria is most common in poor, deprived areas. In many cases, malaria itself is the cause of such poverty: malaria causes havoc on a socioeconomic level as patients are often bedridden and incapable of carrying out normal daily tasks, resulting in burdens on households and health services, and ultimately huge losses to income in malaria-endemic countries. This suffering and loss of life are tragically unnecessary because malaria is largely preventable, detectable, and treatable.
While 90 percent of malaria deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa, the disease is present in nearly every tropical area where  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) carries out field programs: from Ethiopia and Sierra Leone to Cambodia and Myanmar. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Aug 18

Photo by Moises Saman/Magnum
Among the first challenges for Syrian refugees in Lebanon is finding shelter in the absence of any organized camps, a task that’s grown more difficult as their numbers continue to grow and tensions rise with local communities and each other. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Moises Saman/Magnum

Among the first challenges for Syrian refugees in Lebanon is finding shelter in the absence of any organized camps, a task that’s grown more difficult as their numbers continue to grow and tensions rise with local communities and each other. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Aug 16

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor
During a typically busy morning at MSF’s clinic in Domeez camp, Iraq, a staff member checks a man’s injured hand while another checks a baby’s breathing. At least 58,000 people from Syria have sought safety at the camp. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor

During a typically busy morning at MSF’s clinic in Domeez camp, Iraq, a staff member checks a man’s injured hand while another checks a baby’s breathing. At least 58,000 people from Syria have sought safety at the camp. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Aug 15

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor
New families continue to come from Syria to Domeez camp in Iraq, though the resources are stretched to the limit. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor

New families continue to come from Syria to Domeez camp in Iraq, though the resources are stretched to the limit. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Aug 14

Photo by Ton Koene
During morning rounds at MSF’s surgery facility in Ramtha, Jordan, MSF’s Dr. Alwash consults with a colleague about a patient with eye and leg wounds. Staff have carried out more than 1,300 surgeries on more than 430 patients in Ramtha, many of them for severe, life-threatening injuries. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene

During morning rounds at MSF’s surgery facility in Ramtha, Jordan, MSF’s Dr. Alwash consults with a colleague about a patient with eye and leg wounds. Staff have carried out more than 1,300 surgeries on more than 430 patients in Ramtha, many of them for severe, life-threatening injuries. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Aug 13

Photo by Ton Koene
In Ramtha, Jordan, MSF’s Dr. Ben Gupta plays chess with a 14-year-old boy named Malik who lost one leg and sustained severe injuries to his other extremities when a bomb fell on a wedding party at his family’s home in Syria. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene

In Ramtha, Jordan, MSF’s Dr. Ben Gupta plays chess with a 14-year-old boy named Malik who lost one leg and sustained severe injuries to his other extremities when a bomb fell on a wedding party at his family’s home in Syria. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Aug 12

There is no cure for HIV/AIDS, although treatments are much more successful than they used to be. A combination of drugs, known as anti-retrovirals (ARVs), help combat the virus and enable people to live longer, healthier lives without their immune system rapidly declining. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) HIV/AIDS programs offer HIV testing with pre- and post-test counseling, treatment and prevention of opportunistic infections, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and provision of ARVs for people in the late stages of the disease. Our programs also generally include support of prevention, education, and awareness activities to help people understand how to prevent the spread of the virus. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

There is no cure for HIV/AIDS, although treatments are much more successful than they used to be. A combination of drugs, known as anti-retrovirals (ARVs), help combat the virus and enable people to live longer, healthier lives without their immune system rapidly declining. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) HIV/AIDS programs offer HIV testing with pre- and post-test counseling, treatment and prevention of opportunistic infections, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and provision of ARVs for people in the late stages of the disease. Our programs also generally include support of prevention, education, and awareness activities to help people understand how to prevent the spread of the virus. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Photo by Ton Koene
Rukaya goes bravely into the operating room for her seventh surgery at MSF’s emergency surgery hospital in Ramtha, Iraq. The 14-year-old lost her legs and her mother in a bomb attack in Syria. “I don’t remember how I got here,” she says. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria. 

Photo by Ton Koene

Rukaya goes bravely into the operating room for her seventh surgery at MSF’s emergency surgery hospital in Ramtha, Iraq. The 14-year-old lost her legs and her mother in a bomb attack in Syria. “I don’t remember how I got here,” she says. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria. 

Aug 11

Photo by Moises Saman
Poor living conditions in Syrian refugee settlements in Lebanon and the uncertainty of such a life can lead to physical and psychological issues that MSF tries to address in clinics it has established in the country—like this one in Majdal Anjar—and through outreach efforts in refugee settlements. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria. 

Photo by Moises Saman

Poor living conditions in Syrian refugee settlements in Lebanon and the uncertainty of such a life can lead to physical and psychological issues that MSF tries to address in clinics it has established in the country—like this one in Majdal Anjar—and through outreach efforts in refugee settlements. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria. 

Photo by Ton Koene
Dr. Alwash, an Iraqi surgeon who was once a refugee himself, visits a patient who was wounded in his arm, chest, and leg. “All our patients are newly injured in this conflict,” he says, usually by bombs or gunshots. “Our work mainly concentrates first on saving lives—surgical procedures that can save lives or save limbs.” See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene

Dr. Alwash, an Iraqi surgeon who was once a refugee himself, visits a patient who was wounded in his arm, chest, and leg. “All our patients are newly injured in this conflict,” he says, usually by bombs or gunshots. “Our work mainly concentrates first on saving lives—surgical procedures that can save lives or save limbs.” See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Aug 05

In more than 20 countries,  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) focuses on reducing maternal and infant mortality through care during pregnancy, birth, and after delivery. Teams provide prenatal consultations, emergency obstetric care, postnatal care, and access to contraception and family planning services. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

In more than 20 countries,  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) focuses on reducing maternal and infant mortality through care during pregnancy, birth, and after delivery. Teams provide prenatal consultations, emergency obstetric care, postnatal care, and access to contraception and family planning services. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Aug 01

Photo by Daniel Barney
Adamou Mohamadou, 30, and his son, Mohamad Nour, seven, are from Zawa, Central African Republic (CAR). “We’ve been here in Gbiti [Cameroon] for a month,” said  Adamou. “His mother is still in Gbiti with our three other children. We left CAR because of an attack on Zawa. We walked for three months. My son was only drinking milk so when the cows died, he did not have anything to eat. I don’t know what will happen next - we are waiting for the Cameroonian government to decide what our fate will be.” Between December 2013 and January 2014, several hundred thousand people fled abuse and violence in CAR, many seeking refuge in Chad and Cameroon. The Chadian government’s decision in May to close its border and the inadequate humanitarian aid offered in Cameroon impede Central Africans from seeking refuge in neighboring countries.

Photo by Daniel Barney

Adamou Mohamadou, 30, and his son, Mohamad Nour, seven, are from Zawa, Central African Republic (CAR). “We’ve been here in Gbiti [Cameroon] for a month,” said  Adamou. “His mother is still in Gbiti with our three other children. We left CAR because of an attack on Zawa. We walked for three months. My son was only drinking milk so when the cows died, he did not have anything to eat. I don’t know what will happen next - we are waiting for the Cameroonian government to decide what our fate will be.” Between December 2013 and January 2014, several hundred thousand people fled abuse and violence in CAR, many seeking refuge in Chad and Cameroon. The Chadian government’s decision in May to close its border and the inadequate humanitarian aid offered in Cameroon impede Central Africans from seeking refuge in neighboring countries.

Photo by Laurence Hoenig/MSF
Alima is 25 years old and from Berberati city in Central African Republic (CAR), where more than half a million people are internally displaced and around 140,000 have taken refuge in border countries due to horrific ongoing fighting. Alima hid for several days at her neighbor’s home before seeking refuge in a church. She was stabbed as she was entering the car which was going to transport her. She never saw her attacker. She made it to Garoua-Boulaï in Cameroon. Her family fled to northern Cameroon, but Alima couldn’t follow and is now on her own.  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) supports the hospital there. In one week, the team provided over 900 medical consultations.   

Photo by Laurence Hoenig/MSF

Alima is 25 years old and from Berberati city in Central African Republic (CAR), where more than half a million people are internally displaced and around 140,000 have taken refuge in border countries due to horrific ongoing fighting. Alima hid for several days at her neighbor’s home before seeking refuge in a church. She was stabbed as she was entering the car which was going to transport her. She never saw her attacker. She made it to Garoua-Boulaï in Cameroon. Her family fled to northern Cameroon, but Alima couldn’t follow and is now on her own.  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) supports the hospital there. In one week, the team provided over 900 medical consultations.   

Jul 31

Photo by Ton Koene
Dr. Alwash, an Iraqi surgeon who was once a refugee himself, visits a patient who was wounded in his arm, chest, and leg. “All our patients are newly injured in this conflict,” he says, usually by bombs or gunshots. “Our work mainly concentrates first on saving lives—surgical procedures that can save lives or save limbs.” Coming next week: “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene

Dr. Alwash, an Iraqi surgeon who was once a refugee himself, visits a patient who was wounded in his arm, chest, and leg. “All our patients are newly injured in this conflict,” he says, usually by bombs or gunshots. “Our work mainly concentrates first on saving lives—surgical procedures that can save lives or save limbs.” Coming next week: “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Jul 30

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor
Patients wait for medical treatment at MSF’s clinic in the Domeez camp for Syrian refugees in Northern Iraq. There are at least 58,000 Syrians living here, waiting to go back home. Coming next week: “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor

Patients wait for medical treatment at MSF’s clinic in the Domeez camp for Syrian refugees in Northern Iraq. There are at least 58,000 Syrians living here, waiting to go back home. Coming next week: “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.