Doctors Without Borders

Apr 18

Photo by Laurence GeaiSonia is 21 years old. Last December, while Sonia was more than seven months pregnant, a wave of extreme violence struck Bangui, the capital of Central African Republic, obliging her to flee her neighborhood and seek refuge in the M’Poko camp. With the help of midwives, Sonia safely delivered her baby in the field hospital set up by MSF in the camp.

Photo by Laurence Geai

Sonia is 21 years old. Last December, while Sonia was more than seven months pregnant, a wave of extreme violence struck Bangui, the capital of Central African Republic, obliging her to flee her neighborhood and seek refuge in the M’Poko camp. With the help of midwives, Sonia safely delivered her baby in the field hospital set up by MSF in the camp.

Photo by Laurence Geai 
Ann Van Haver, midwife for MSF holds a newborn she helped deliver in M’Poko camp in Central African Republic. The camp hosts around 40,000 people who have inadequate access to water, food and shelter. The rainy season is beginning and is certain to make conditions worse. Every day, MSF teams provide over 1,000 medical consultations and assist in at least 10 births.

Photo by Laurence Geai

Ann Van Haver, midwife for MSF holds a newborn she helped deliver in M’Poko camp in Central African Republic. The camp hosts around 40,000 people who have inadequate access to water, food and shelter. The rainy season is beginning and is certain to make conditions worse. Every day, MSF teams provide over 1,000 medical consultations and assist in at least 10 births.

Apr 15

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF
Nearly 60,000 displaced people are currently living in terrible conditions in M’Poko camp in Central African Republic. The already bad hygienic conditions are likely to get worse as the rainy season continues. MSF has set up a field hospital with 60 beds as well as three health posts to cover the medical needs and teams carry out 1,000 medical consultations per day, mainly for malaria, diarrhea, respiratory infections and skin disease linked to the sanitary conditions. Teams are trying to address the hygiene needs by building latrines and providing clean water.

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF


Nearly 60,000 displaced people are currently living in terrible conditions in M’Poko camp in Central African Republic. The already bad hygienic conditions are likely to get worse as the rainy season continues. MSF has set up a field hospital with 60 beds as well as three health posts to cover the medical needs and teams carry out 1,000 medical consultations per day, mainly for malaria, diarrhea, respiratory infections and skin disease linked to the sanitary conditions. Teams are trying to address the hygiene needs by building latrines and providing clean water.

Photo 2013 © Sven Torfinn
Right now, many major drug companies’ business practices keep their own profits high while keeping medicines out of the hands of millions of people who need them. Until we change the way medicines are developed and marketed, too many people will go without needed treatment because quality medicines are not available to them.SHARE THIS IMAGE to show you stand with Doctors Without Borders in calling for access to quality, affordable medical treatment for ALL.

Photo 2013 © Sven Torfinn

Right now, many major drug companies’ business practices keep their own profits high while keeping medicines out of the hands of millions of people who need them. Until we change the way medicines are developed and marketed, too many people will go without needed treatment because quality medicines are not available to them.

SHARE THIS IMAGE to show you stand with Doctors Without Borders in calling for access to quality, affordable medical treatment for ALL.

Apr 07

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Today marks 20 years since the Rwandan genocide during which approximately 800,000 people lost their lives. Many MSF staff were among the dead. For the first time MSF is sharing its internal communications during the genocide and its aftermath with the public. These reports depict the struggles and humanitarian dilemmas that the organization faced internally. See MSF’s Speaking Out Case Studies: http://speakingout.msf.org/en/genocide-of-rwandan-tutsi

Today marks 20 years since the Rwandan genocide during which approximately 800,000 people lost their lives. Many MSF staff were among the dead. For the first time MSF is sharing its internal communications during the genocide and its aftermath with the public. These reports depict the struggles and humanitarian dilemmas that the organization faced internally. See MSF’s Speaking Out Case Studies: http://speakingout.msf.org/en/genocide-of-rwandan-tutsi

Apr 03

Today! Join Doctors Without Borders on Reddit.com for an AMA at 2pm EDT to ask anything you want to know about drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). The direct link will be posted here by 2pm: http://bit.ly/PiMsOM

Today! Join Doctors Without Borders on Reddit.com for an AMA at 2pm EDT to ask anything you want to know about drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). The direct link will be posted here by 2pm: http://bit.ly/PiMsOM

Apr 01

Join us on Reddit THURSDAY at 2pm EDT/6pm GMT to Ask Us Anything about drug-resistant TB. Kees Keus has managed MSF’s TB project in Swaziland for 4 years and Jezza Neumann directed the new FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, now available at pbs.org/frontline. This AMA is an opportunity to ask anything you want to know about drug-resistant TB. Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions

Join us on Reddit THURSDAY at 2pm EDT/6pm GMT to Ask Us Anything about drug-resistant TB. Kees Keus has managed MSF’s TB project in Swaziland for 4 years and Jezza Neumann directed the new FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, now available at pbs.org/frontline. This AMA is an opportunity to ask anything you want to know about drug-resistant TB. Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF
This past weekend, MSF treated 28 people injured during fighting in Bangui, Central African Republic. Of those patients, 16 were women and four were children, from babies up to 15 years old. Most injuries were caused by bullets and grenade shrapnel. Read the latest report:http://bit.ly/1mFMRZK

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

This past weekend, MSF treated 28 people injured during fighting in Bangui, Central African Republic. Of those patients, 16 were women and four were children, from babies up to 15 years old. Most injuries were caused by bullets and grenade shrapnel. Read the latest report:http://bit.ly/1mFMRZK

Mar 24

Today is World TB Day. Sign our TB Manifesto and help us demand better medicines and diagnostics for people with drug-resistant forms of the deadly disease: http://ow.ly/uN7mW 

Today is World TB Day. Sign our TB Manifesto and help us demand better medicines and diagnostics for people with drug-resistant forms of the deadly disease: http://ow.ly/uN7mW 

Mar 21

Photo by Samantha Maurin /MSF
The refugees, including many children, from CAR who’ve arrived seeking safety in Sido, Chad, have witnessed the worst atrocities. “Most of the refugees who told me their stories did so in a monotone, with solemn faces,” said an MSF psychiatrist, “without going into details about the bodies carved up in the massacres, keeping their distance from the expression of painful emotions.”http://bit.ly/1mfQyVR

Photo by Samantha Maurin /MSF

The refugees, including many children, from CAR who’ve arrived seeking safety in Sido, Chad, have witnessed the worst atrocities. “Most of the refugees who told me their stories did so in a monotone, with solemn faces,” said an MSF psychiatrist, “without going into details about the bodies carved up in the massacres, keeping their distance from the expression of painful emotions.”http://bit.ly/1mfQyVR

Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions
10-year-old Nokubegha is battling drug-resistant TB in Swaziland. He is featured in the FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, airing on PBS Tuesday, March 25. See the trailer: http://bit.ly/1d4KLzi 

Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions

10-year-old Nokubegha is battling drug-resistant TB in Swaziland. He is featured in the FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, airing on PBS Tuesday, March 25. See the trailer: http://bit.ly/1d4KLzi 

Mar 18

"I didn’t want to be another statistic of TB." Phumeza endured incredibly arduous treatment for her extensively drug-resistant TB. Now she is asking for better care for all TB patients. Sign the TB Manifesto:http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/Photo by Sydelle Willow Smith

"I didn’t want to be another statistic of TB." Phumeza endured incredibly arduous treatment for her extensively drug-resistant TB. Now she is asking for better care for all TB patients. Sign the TB Manifesto:http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/
Photo by Sydelle Willow Smith

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Mar 08

Photo by Karl Nawezi/MSF
Taghry and Masaya, along with six children, were among the 15,000 people who fled the conflict in Mali in January 2013 and sought safety in neighboring Mauritania. They arrived with nothing other than the clothes on their backs and are now completely dependent on humanitarian aid….On arriving in Bassikounou, an ultrasound confirmed Taghry was pregnant with quadruplets. The MSF medical team made the quick decision to perform a caesarean section. Taghry gave birth to three small but healthy boys and one healthy girl. At first, they are simply called Baby 1, 2, 3 and 4. Saturday is International Women’s Day. On that day, and every day, thousands of women worldwide will leave their homes to flee war or persecution. The fact that they are women makes their ordeal even more harrowing. Read this and other stories: http://bit.ly/1fLR5fE

Photo by Karl Nawezi/MSF

Taghry and Masaya, along with six children, were among the 15,000 people who fled the conflict in Mali in January 2013 and sought safety in neighboring Mauritania. They arrived with nothing other than the clothes on their backs and are now completely dependent on humanitarian aid….On arriving in Bassikounou, an ultrasound confirmed Taghry was pregnant with quadruplets. The MSF medical team made the quick decision to perform a caesarean section. Taghry gave birth to three small but healthy boys and one healthy girl. At first, they are simply called Baby 1, 2, 3 and 4. Saturday is International Women’s Day. On that day, and every day, thousands of women worldwide will leave their homes to flee war or persecution. The fact that they are women makes their ordeal even more harrowing. Read this and other stories: http://bit.ly/1fLR5fE