Doctors Without Borders

Oct 14

Photo by Ikram N’gadi
Syrians take pictures of their journey with the use of smartphone videos and cameras. The flow of people making the perilous crossing nearly doubled between June and August. According to UNHCR figures, more than 50% of refugee migrants are fleeing war and persecution, with Eritreans (29%) and Syrians (18%) the main nationalities recorded on arrival.
Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Photo by Ikram N’gadi

Syrians take pictures of their journey with the use of smartphone videos and cameras. The flow of people making the perilous crossing nearly doubled between June and August. According to UNHCR figures, more than 50% of refugee migrants are fleeing war and persecution, with Eritreans (29%) and Syrians (18%) the main nationalities recorded on arrival.

Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Photo by Ikram N’gadi
An Eritrean woman sits at transit camp in the Augusta port. She feels safe now that she is in Italy and is looking forward to a new life. She speaks four languages and is confident about the future. She tells the story of how she arrived in Italy:
“I came from Eritrea, through Sudan to Libya. I lived three months in Libya. There was a terrible war in Tripoli. There was no food or water available. The smugglers are the ones who beat you, take your money and take care of the trip (to Italy). My husband and I didn’t come together. He arrived first and I arrived the following day. When he saw me, he wanted to greet me, so he was beaten. We were separated and stayed in different houses. Me, I was not hurt. But they say for a woman alone, things happen in the desert: there are rape and abuse cases, girls are taken away, they get pregnant.
We spent three days in the desert. I saw three people buried. One had diabetes, he wanted a sip of water and food. They beat him and he died. They buried him in the desert and that was it. Death crossed my mind, yes. They beat you, they deprive you of food and water and they insult you. You cry day and night. You shed tears around the clock. You remember your homeland and when you call your parents, you lie; you say ‘I am fine’. You say ‘I eat and drink’, while you are sick and dying.”
Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Photo by Ikram N’gadi

An Eritrean woman sits at transit camp in the Augusta port. She feels safe now that she is in Italy and is looking forward to a new life. She speaks four languages and is confident about the future. She tells the story of how she arrived in Italy:

“I came from Eritrea, through Sudan to Libya. I lived three months in Libya. There was a terrible war in Tripoli. There was no food or water available. The smugglers are the ones who beat you, take your money and take care of the trip (to Italy). My husband and I didn’t come together. He arrived first and I arrived the following day. When he saw me, he wanted to greet me, so he was beaten. We were separated and stayed in different houses. Me, I was not hurt. But they say for a woman alone, things happen in the desert: there are rape and abuse cases, girls are taken away, they get pregnant.

We spent three days in the desert. I saw three people buried. One had diabetes, he wanted a sip of water and food. They beat him and he died. They buried him in the desert and that was it. Death crossed my mind, yes. They beat you, they deprive you of food and water and they insult you. You cry day and night. You shed tears around the clock. You remember your homeland and when you call your parents, you lie; you say ‘I am fine’. You say ‘I eat and drink’, while you are sick and dying.”

Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Oct 10

Photo by Ikram N’gadi
A young Eritrean woman kisses the ground of Augusta port after a sea rescue operation. Despite an Italian search and rescue operation, at least 1,565 people have died at sea or have been reported missing since June.
Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Photo by Ikram N’gadi

A young Eritrean woman kisses the ground of Augusta port after a sea rescue operation. Despite an Italian search and rescue operation, at least 1,565 people have died at sea or have been reported missing since June.

Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

 Photo by Ikram N’gadi
A young man from Gambia prays inside the transit camp in the port of Augusta, Italy, just a few hours after he was rescued at sea. Since January, more than 130,000 people have travelled the Central Mediterranean route from Northern Libya to reach Italy.
Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Photo by Ikram N’gadi

A young man from Gambia prays inside the transit camp in the port of Augusta, Italy, just a few hours after he was rescued at sea. Since January, more than 130,000 people have travelled the Central Mediterranean route from Northern Libya to reach Italy.

Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Sep 23

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
“Residents have written on banners or sections of walls that are still standing. ‘Here I had an ice cream shop,’ ‘Here I had a car garage’, ‘If you want to help, call…’ In Haiti after the earthquake, I saw the same level of destruction, except here it is not because of a natural disaster,” said Michele Beck, MSF medical team leader. Beit Hanoun is one of the neighborhoods most affected by the bombings in northern Gaza.
Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

“Residents have written on banners or sections of walls that are still standing. ‘Here I had an ice cream shop,’ ‘Here I had a car garage’, ‘If you want to help, call…’ In Haiti after the earthquake, I saw the same level of destruction, except here it is not because of a natural disaster,” said Michele Beck, MSF medical team leader. Beit Hanoun is one of the neighborhoods most affected by the bombings in northern Gaza.

Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
About 1,500 people, including 350 children, are using this UN school in Beit Hanoun as a displaced persons camp. The camp has poor hygiene, no electricity, nor running water. On average, 50 people share one room. Beit Hanoun is one of the neighborhoods most affected by the bombings in northern Gaza. There, “…whole streets are no more than piles of rubble,” said Michele Beck, MSF medical team leader.
Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

About 1,500 people, including 350 children, are using this UN school in Beit Hanoun as a displaced persons camp. The camp has poor hygiene, no electricity, nor running water. On average, 50 people share one room. Beit Hanoun is one of the neighborhoods most affected by the bombings in northern Gaza. There, “…whole streets are no more than piles of rubble,” said Michele Beck, MSF medical team leader.

Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Sep 19

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
Children play in the debris in Shejaaia, one of the neighborhoods most affected by the bombings in northern Gaza. MSF surgical teams continue to work alongside staff from the Palestinian Ministry of Health at Al Shifa, as they have been doing since the Israeli army launched Operation Protective Edge on July 8.
Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

Children play in the debris in Shejaaia, one of the neighborhoods most affected by the bombings in northern Gaza. MSF surgical teams continue to work alongside staff from the Palestinian Ministry of Health at Al Shifa, as they have been doing since the Israeli army launched Operation Protective Edge on July 8.

Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
A Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) doctor changes the dressing on an external fixator in the MSF clinic in central Gaza. For 50 days, health staff and patients at Gaza’s Al Shifa hospital, where Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been providing support, lived and worked in a cycle of fighting, ceasefire, and renewed fighting. However, on August 26, an open-ended ceasefire went into effect, bringing a massive sense of relief to health workers and to the population of Gaza as a whole. Though the fighting has ended, activity in the largest hospital in Gaza continues, unabated.
Go to: https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) doctor changes the dressing on an external fixator in the MSF clinic in central Gaza. For 50 days, health staff and patients at Gaza’s Al Shifa hospital, where Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been providing support, lived and worked in a cycle of fighting, ceasefire, and renewed fighting. However, on August 26, an open-ended ceasefire went into effect, bringing a massive sense of relief to health workers and to the population of Gaza as a whole. Though the fighting has ended, activity in the largest hospital in Gaza continues, unabated.

Go to: https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

Sep 16

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
Children who were vaccinated as part of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)’s campaign wait on the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Central African Republic.  MSF is providing around 3,600 to 4,600 consultations per month, of which one third are children under five.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

Children who were vaccinated as part of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)’s campaign wait on the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Central African Republic.  MSF is providing around 3,600 to 4,600 consultations per month, of which one third are children under five.

Sep 12

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
A child, vaccinated as part of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) campaign on the grounds of the Grand Mosque in Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR), reaches out to the camera.  In April, more than 3,000 consultations were provided, of which 1,340 were related to malaria.  In early August, the teams saw about 700 children per week, one third of whom were admitted for malaria.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

A child, vaccinated as part of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) campaign on the grounds of the Grand Mosque in Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR), reaches out to the camera.  In April, more than 3,000 consultations were provided, of which 1,340 were related to malaria.  In early August, the teams saw about 700 children per week, one third of whom were admitted for malaria.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
A mother and child on the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Bangui, Central African Republic, proceed to be vaccinated by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), while in the background displaced people line up for an initial assessment.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

A mother and child on the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Bangui, Central African Republic, proceed to be vaccinated by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), while in the background displaced people line up for an initial assessment.

Sep 09

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
On the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Central African Republic, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) vaccinated 482 children, from 0 to 59 months, on Saturday, July 26, 2014. Depending on age, children received the pentavalent vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, polio) and a vaccination against measles, yellow fever and pneumonia.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

On the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Central African Republic, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) vaccinated 482 children, from 0 to 59 months, on Saturday, July 26, 2014. Depending on age, children received the pentavalent vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, polio) and a vaccination against measles, yellow fever and pneumonia.

Photos by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has established a 24/7 ambulance service that continues to provide emergency transportation and transfers to the hospital for all patients at the health center at Mamadou M’Baiki, in PK5.  

Photos by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has established a 24/7 ambulance service that continues to provide emergency transportation and transfers to the hospital for all patients at the health center at Mamadou M’Baiki, in PK5.  

Sep 05

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
In April 2014, Seleka men attacked and robbed this woman and her stepdaughter. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) provides medical and psychological care to victims of sexual violence in the general hospital of Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR). Activities began on July 5th 2014, and in nearly a month, the team had already dealt with 75 patients; women, men and children.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

In April 2014, Seleka men attacked and robbed this woman and her stepdaughter. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) provides medical and psychological care to victims of sexual violence in the general hospital of Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR). Activities began on July 5th 2014, and in nearly a month, the team had already dealt with 75 patients; women, men and children.

Aurelie Baumel/MSF
On Saturday, July 26th, 2014, the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) team carries out a vaccination campaign on the grounds of the Grand Mosque in Bangui, in the Central African Republic, in the district of PK5, where thousands of displaced people are gathered. Many are afraid to travel to the Mamadou M’Baïki health center for treatment.

Aurelie Baumel/MSF

On Saturday, July 26th, 2014, the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) team carries out a vaccination campaign on the grounds of the Grand Mosque in Bangui, in the Central African Republic, in the district of PK5, where thousands of displaced people are gathered. Many are afraid to travel to the Mamadou M’Baïki health center for treatment.