Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
A child, vaccinated as part of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) campaign on the grounds of the Grand Mosque in Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR), reaches out to the camera.  In April, more than 3,000 consultations were provided, of which 1,340 were related to malaria.  In early August, the teams saw about 700 children per week, one third of whom were admitted for malaria.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

A child, vaccinated as part of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) campaign on the grounds of the Grand Mosque in Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR), reaches out to the camera.  In April, more than 3,000 consultations were provided, of which 1,340 were related to malaria.  In early August, the teams saw about 700 children per week, one third of whom were admitted for malaria.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
A mother and child on the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Bangui, Central African Republic, proceed to be vaccinated by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), while in the background displaced people line up for an initial assessment.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

A mother and child on the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Bangui, Central African Republic, proceed to be vaccinated by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), while in the background displaced people line up for an initial assessment.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
On the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Central African Republic, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) vaccinated 482 children, from 0 to 59 months, on Saturday, July 26, 2014. Depending on age, children received the pentavalent vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, polio) and a vaccination against measles, yellow fever and pneumonia.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

On the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Central African Republic, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) vaccinated 482 children, from 0 to 59 months, on Saturday, July 26, 2014. Depending on age, children received the pentavalent vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, polio) and a vaccination against measles, yellow fever and pneumonia.

Photos by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has established a 24/7 ambulance service that continues to provide emergency transportation and transfers to the hospital for all patients at the health center at Mamadou M’Baiki, in PK5.  

Photos by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has established a 24/7 ambulance service that continues to provide emergency transportation and transfers to the hospital for all patients at the health center at Mamadou M’Baiki, in PK5.  

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
In April 2014, Seleka men attacked and robbed this woman and her stepdaughter. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) provides medical and psychological care to victims of sexual violence in the general hospital of Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR). Activities began on July 5th 2014, and in nearly a month, the team had already dealt with 75 patients; women, men and children.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

In April 2014, Seleka men attacked and robbed this woman and her stepdaughter. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) provides medical and psychological care to victims of sexual violence in the general hospital of Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR). Activities began on July 5th 2014, and in nearly a month, the team had already dealt with 75 patients; women, men and children.

Aurelie Baumel/MSF
On Saturday, July 26th, 2014, the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) team carries out a vaccination campaign on the grounds of the Grand Mosque in Bangui, in the Central African Republic, in the district of PK5, where thousands of displaced people are gathered. Many are afraid to travel to the Mamadou M’Baïki health center for treatment.

Aurelie Baumel/MSF

On Saturday, July 26th, 2014, the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) team carries out a vaccination campaign on the grounds of the Grand Mosque in Bangui, in the Central African Republic, in the district of PK5, where thousands of displaced people are gathered. Many are afraid to travel to the Mamadou M’Baïki health center for treatment.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
At the health center at Mamadou M’Baiki, in PK5, the Primary Health Care project was initiated in early January 2014. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has worked in the Central African Republic since 1997 and currently has more than 300 international staff and more than 2,000 Central African workers in the country. MSF treats children aged 0-15 and provides free medication for children and adults.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

At the health center at Mamadou M’Baiki, in PK5, the Primary Health Care project was initiated in early January 2014. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has worked in the Central African Republic since 1997 and currently has more than 300 international staff and more than 2,000 Central African workers in the country. MSF treats children aged 0-15 and provides free medication for children and adults.

Though the global death rate from tuberculosis (TB) dropped more than 40 percent in in the years between 1990 and 2011, there are still crucial gaps in coverage and severe shortcomings when it comes to diagnostics and care options. Furthermore, we are currently seeing an alarming rise in cases of drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB and MDR-TB) that do not respond to the customary first-line drugs. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been fighting TB for over 30 years and provides treatment for the disease in many different contexts, from chronic conflict situations, such as Sudan, to vulnerable patients in stable settings such as Uzbekistan and the Russian Federation. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Though the global death rate from tuberculosis (TB) dropped more than 40 percent in in the years between 1990 and 2011, there are still crucial gaps in coverage and severe shortcomings when it comes to diagnostics and care options. Furthermore, we are currently seeing an alarming rise in cases of drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB and MDR-TB) that do not respond to the customary first-line drugs. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been fighting TB for over 30 years and provides treatment for the disease in many different contexts, from chronic conflict situations, such as Sudan, to vulnerable patients in stable settings such as Uzbekistan and the Russian Federation. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has surgery teams to address medical issues ranging from fistula and other issues of obstetric care to tuberculosis patients and trauma surgery for those injured during wartime, as well as reconstructive surgery, as in our project in Amman, Jordan. "I am a surgeon but I am also a human being, and [I am] affected by what I see in my work," said MSF surgeon Ali Al-Ani of his experience providing care in Amman. ”I feel pain when I am face-to-face with innocent children and older men and women whose lives have been forever changed by man-made conflict. But as a surgeon, I am in a position to treat these vulnerable people, to make them smile and enjoy a sense of independence again. I feel proud that this project has relieved the suffering of so many patients—by reconstructing their injured bodies and helping them to regain functionality—especially as those who are referred here may not be able to afford such care otherwise.” Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has surgery teams to address medical issues ranging from fistula and other issues of obstetric care to tuberculosis patients and trauma surgery for those injured during wartime, as well as reconstructive surgery, as in our project in Amman, Jordan. "I am a surgeon but I am also a human being, and [I am] affected by what I see in my work," said MSF surgeon Ali Al-Ani of his experience providing care in Amman. ”I feel pain when I am face-to-face with innocent children and older men and women whose lives have been forever changed by man-made conflict. But as a surgeon, I am in a position to treat these vulnerable people, to make them smile and enjoy a sense of independence again. I feel proud that this project has relieved the suffering of so many patients—by reconstructing their injured bodies and helping them to regain functionality—especially as those who are referred here may not be able to afford such care otherwise.” Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) strives to treat victims of sexual violence in all of its programs worldwide. Specialized programs for such patients are operated by MSF in more than 120 projects and include both medical and mental health care. Sexual violence affects millions of people, destroying lives and families and damaging communities. It is a medical emergency, the impact of which is compounded in many countries by a dire absence of health care services for the victims. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) strives to treat victims of sexual violence in all of its programs worldwide. Specialized programs for such patients are operated by MSF in more than 120 projects and include both medical and mental health care. Sexual violence affects millions of people, destroying lives and families and damaging communities. It is a medical emergency, the impact of which is compounded in many countries by a dire absence of health care services for the victims. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Many of the places where  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works are societies where it is difficult for women to implement contraception in their relationships and where women are not encouraged or allowed to freely access health care. A woman’s health is often a family business and she needs her husband’s permission to go to the doctor, sometimes even to receive lifesaving treatment. Without a supportive family, getting tested for and taking treatment for HIV/AIDS can be very challenging for women. More than 90 percent of HIV-positive children contract the virus from mother during pregnancy, birth, or breastfeeding. MSF is working to break the transmission chain. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Many of the places where  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works are societies where it is difficult for women to implement contraception in their relationships and where women are not encouraged or allowed to freely access health care. A woman’s health is often a family business and she needs her husband’s permission to go to the doctor, sometimes even to receive lifesaving treatment. Without a supportive family, getting tested for and taking treatment for HIV/AIDS can be very challenging for women. More than 90 percent of HIV-positive children contract the virus from mother during pregnancy, birth, or breastfeeding. MSF is working to break the transmission chain. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) outpatient centers treat malnutrition, drug-resistant tuberculosis, respiratory tract infections, and other medical issues closer to home for many patients. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) outpatient centers treat malnutrition, drug-resistant tuberculosis, respiratory tract infections, and other medical issues closer to home for many patients. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) provides emergency medical aid in response to armed conflicts, natural disasters, famines, and epidemics. MSF doctors and nurses are often seen treating physical ailments, but for more than 20 years, MSF has also been caring for patients’ mental health. In 1998, MSF formally recognized the need to implement mental health and psychosocial interventions as part of our emergency work. For people who have lived through terrible events, the psychological consequences can be severe. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) provides emergency medical aid in response to armed conflicts, natural disasters, famines, and epidemics. MSF doctors and nurses are often seen treating physical ailments, but for more than 20 years, MSF has also been caring for patients’ mental health. In 1998, MSF formally recognized the need to implement mental health and psychosocial interventions as part of our emergency work. For people who have lived through terrible events, the psychological consequences can be severe. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

When children suffer from acute malnutrition, their immune systems are so impaired that the risk of death is greatly increased. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), malnutrition is the single greatest threat to the world’s public health, with 178 million malnourished children across the globe. The critical age for malnutrition is from six months – when mothers generally start supplementing breast milk – to 24 months. However, children under five, adolescents, pregnant, or breastfeeding women, the elderly and the chronically ill are also vulnerable. People become malnourished if they are unable to take in enough or fully utilize the food they eat, due to illnesses such as diarrhea or other longstanding illnesses, such as measles, HIV, and tuberculosis. 

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) estimates that only three percent of the 20 million children suffering from severe acute malnutrition receive the lifesaving treatment they need. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.
When children suffer from acute malnutrition, their immune systems are so impaired that the risk of death is greatly increased. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), malnutrition is the single greatest threat to the world’s public health, with 178 million malnourished children across the globe. The critical age for malnutrition is from six months – when mothers generally start supplementing breast milk – to 24 months. However, children under five, adolescents, pregnant, or breastfeeding women, the elderly and the chronically ill are also vulnerable. People become malnourished if they are unable to take in enough or fully utilize the food they eat, due to illnesses such as diarrhea or other longstanding illnesses, such as measles, HIV, and tuberculosis. 
Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) estimates that only three percent of the 20 million children suffering from severe acute malnutrition receive the lifesaving treatment they need. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.
While global measles deaths have decreased by 78 percent worldwide in recent years – from 542,000 in 2000 to 122,000 in 2012 (according to the World Health Organization) – measles is still common in many developing countries, particularly in parts of Africa and Asia. A safe and effective vaccine has existed since the 1960s but outbreaks still occur due to ineffective or insufficient immunization programs. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

While global measles deaths have decreased by 78 percent worldwide in recent years – from 542,000 in 2000 to 122,000 in 2012 (according to the World Health Organization) – measles is still common in many developing countries, particularly in parts of Africa and Asia. A safe and effective vaccine has existed since the 1960s but outbreaks still occur due to ineffective or insufficient immunization programs. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.